TribLIVE

| Opinion/The Review


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Coming end to racial preferences

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

By Walter Williams
Thursday, May 8, 2014, 8:55 p.m.
 

Last week's U.S. Supreme Court 6-2 ruling in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action et al. upheld Michigan's constitutional amendment that bans racial preferences in admission to its public universities.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor lashed out at her colleagues in a bitter dissent, calling them “out of touch with reality.” She went on to make the incredible argument that the amendment, which explicitly forbids racial discrimination, itself amounts to racial discrimination. Her argument was that permissible “race-sensitive admissions policies” both serve the compelling interest of obtaining the educational benefits that flow from a diverse student body and inure people to the benefit of racial minorities. By the way, no one has come up with hard evidence of the supposed “educational benefits” that come from a racially mixed student body.

Far more important than the legal battles over racial preferences in college admissions is the question of why they are being called for in the first place. Blacks score at least 100 points lower on the SATs than whites in each of the assessment areas. Asians score higher than whites in math and writing. Blacks score lower than Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, Indians and others, who themselves score lower than whites and Asians.

If we reject the racist notion of mental inferiority of blacks, holding that blacks can never compete academically and that “racially sensitive” college admissions are needed in perpetuity, we must seek an explanation for their relatively poor academic performance. My longtime colleague and friend Thomas Sowell offers some evidence in a recent column, “Will Dunbar Rise Again?” ( tinyurl.com/mjt39ks).

Washington's Paul Laurence Dunbar High School was founded in 1870 as the first public high school in the nation for black students. As far back as 1899, Dunbar students scored higher than students in two of the city's three white high schools. Over the first several decades of the 20th century, about 80 percent of Dunbar graduates went on to college. Among those blacks who went on to Ivy League and other elite colleges, a significant number graduated Phi Beta Kappa. At one time, Dunbar graduates were admitted to Dartmouth or Harvard without having to take an entrance exam. One would have to be a lunatic to chalk up this academic success to Sotomayor's “race-sensitive admissions policies.”

The shame of the nation is that poor black children are trapped in terrible schools. But worse than that is that white liberals, black politicians and civil rights leaders, perhaps unwittingly, have taken steps to ensure that black children remain trapped.

Sowell says, “Of all the cynical frauds of the Obama administration, few are so despicable as sacrificing the education of poor and minority children to the interests of the teachers unions.” Attorney General Eric Holder's hostility, along with that of the teachers unions, toward the spread of charter schools is just one sign of that cynicism. Holder's threats against schools that discipline more black students than he thinks they should add official support to a hostile learning environment.

The weakening of racial preferences in college admissions can be beneficial if it can focus our attention on the causes of the huge gap in academic achievement between blacks and whites and Asians. Worrying about what happens when blacks are trying to get in to college is too late — 12 years late.

Walter Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Trooper fatally shoots burglary suspect inside Somerset grocery store
  2. Armed bandit holds up Leechburg gas station
  3. Baldwin-Whitehall teacher charged with assault for hitting male student in chest
  4. Allegheny Medical Examiner’s Office responds to Coraopolis train-pedestrian incident
  5. Steelers offensive line targeting injury-free performance as key
  6. Two jail inmates died at UPMC Mercy, medical examiner’s office says
  7. DOJ program goal: Increased trust between law enforcement, community
  8. Officials envision reinvigorated Allegheny County Airport
  9. Westmoreland used car dealers indicted in fraud
  10. New Kensington Megan’s Law offender jailed on new child porn charges
  11. Starkey: Patriots’ legacy forever stained