TribLIVE

| Opinion/The Review


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

That complicated thing called 'marriage'

Daily Photo Galleries

By John Stossel
Saturday, May 17, 2014, 9:00 p.m.
 

It's wedding season! More Americans get married in June than in other months. Why June? The timing seems pretty arbitrary if you look up its history.

Some claim it's because June was named after Juno, the Roman goddess of marriage.

Others say it's because in the 1500s, people took their annual bath in May, which meant they probably smelled best around this time of year. A third and more plausible explanation: If a bride got pregnant in June, she wouldn't be too big during summer to help with growing and harvesting food.

Whatever the reason for choosing June, marriage is an ancient custom, and its core function of giving kids a stable home remains very important. Most kids do better if their parents are married, so it's not a good thing that fewer American parents marry these days.

Manhattan Institute scholar Kay Hymowitz says divorce and remarriage doesn't help kids much either. She noted, “One thing we see, particularly with boys,” is that after a divorce, even if there is a new father figure in the picture, “children are more likely to have trouble in school, more likely to have behavioral problems.”

Because of such data, politicians rush in with your money to “help” people stay married. But does government help? Probably not.

Every year, government gives the group Family Expectations $100 million to teach couples how to have “healthy relationships.” Family Expectations gives parents “crib cash” if they follow certain rules and advice.

Does this preserve marriage? No. The government's own study found that couples who attended Family Expectations workshops were no more likely to stay together.

So did politicians stop the funding? Of course not. They're politicians — they never stop throwing your money away. This year, they gave Family Expectations another $100 million.

Republicans in Oklahoma may have stumbled onto a better idea regarding government's role in marriage.

They were angry because a judge ruled their state must recognize gay marriages — so they proposed that the state stop recognizing any marriages.

They might have been throwing a tantrum, but getting government out of the mix would put an end to many stupid fights.

If private individuals are free to make whatever marriage contracts and observe whatever marriage customs they like, that leaves everyone else free to ignore those couples if they don't approve.

Arrangements that work best will tend to endure. But always be very suspicious if government says it's bringing the perfect gift to the wedding.

John Stossel is host of “Stossel” on the Fox Business Network. He's the author of “No They Can't: Why Government Fails, but Individuals Succeed.”

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Tomlin: Possible Steelers midseason surge won’t come easy vs. Colts
  2. 7 in custody after New Kensington drug raid
  3. Hundreds mourn Pittsburgh trash collector killed by gunfire
  4. Rossi: Steelers’ season all about going big
  5. North Catholic High School principal steps down
  6. Rookie Bryant sparks deep passing game for Steelers in victory
  7. Steelers use 3 late first-half TDs to stun Texans
  8. Leon Ford appeals traffic violation conviction to Superior Court
  9. Military commissary opening draws 400 visitors
  10. 5 selected thus far for jury in Ferrante trial
  11. 12-year-old’s donated heart joins families, lets her memory live
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.