Share This Page

An emergency call on Westmoreland County's 911 Center funding

| Friday, June 6, 2014, 8:57 p.m.

Public safety, particularly the operation of Westmoreland's state-of-the-art 911 Center, is a critical function of county government. It impacts everyone and every community. Yet the means by which it is funded is in jeopardy, putting at risk the operation of this most vital, life-saving service.

When you call 911, you rightfully expect a prompt, reliable and accurate response. You deserve to have capable, well-trained professionals answering your call 24/7 and dispatching first responders using the newest technology. The tools needed to ensure the proper emergency response are high-tech, sophisticated and often expensive.

For years 911 centers throughout Pennsylvania have been underfunded, but now the source of funding is at risk of disappearing without action from the state Legislature and governor this summer.

The primary source of funding comes from surcharges on phone lines — $1.25 for every landline and $1 for every mobile phone. These fees were designed to fund the operation of the 911 Center and minimize reliance on your property tax dollars. They have not.

More and more households have done away with landlines, lowering that source of revenue. Now the $1 cellphone charge is set to expire completely on June 30.

In 2013, Westmoreland County received $3.2 million from the cellphone fee — roughly 40 percent of the total budget of the 911 Center. That amount has been relatively flat over the years. The remainder of the center's budget comes from the landline fee ($2.3 million) and local county dollars ($3 million).

Knowing that the money from the $1.25 landline fee is going to continue to go down (no one is going back to using the family phone in the kitchen) and that we cannot continue to rely on local dollars while keeping county property taxes stable, the best option to maximize revenue to fund the 911 Center is through the cellphone fund. It not only needs to be reauthorized but also increased slightly to keep pace with inflation.

The cost of practically everything has increased over the past decade since Act 56 of 2003 established the $1 mobile phone charge. Yet we've been shortchanging our own public safety. It's time that this small amount be increased to better cover the costs of 911 services. Even doubling the fee to $2 means only an extra dollar or two a month, depending on your number of phones.

A couple of bucks a month to ensure accurate, reliable emergency response for you and your loved ones? It's a great deal! The alternative is to make the 911 Center more reliant on your local property tax dollars, taking away needed funds for senior citizen services, programming for people with developmental disabilities, economic-development projects or upkeep at our parks — or eventually a property tax increase.

We cannot allow our legislators and governor to hide behind “no-tax” pledges or some other flimsy excuse to allow this necessary funding stream to expire. They should not take the easy way out, either, and simply continue today's paltry, insufficient funding levels.

As Westmoreland County residents, we should all be proud of our 911 Center and have great confidence that we will get the help we need in our most vulnerable times. We owe it to ourselves to make sure it's adequately funded.

Ted Kopas, a Democrat, is a Westmoreland County commissioner.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.