TribLIVE

| Opinion/The Review


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Bergdahl's backstory

Daily Photo Galleries

By Michelle Malkin
Sunday, June 8, 2014, 9:00 p.m.
 

Five years ago, I publicly raised questions about Bowe Bergdahl's desertion. A few weeks after his so-called “capture” in late June 2009, three conflicting accounts surfaced: U.S. officials told The Associated Press that Bergdahl had “walked off” the base with three Afghans; the Taliban claimed on its website that “a drunken American soldier had come out of his garrison” and into their arms; and Bergdahl claimed in his Taliban “hostage video” that he had “lagged behind a patrol” before being captured.

Five years ago, one of the brave soldiers who risked his life to search for Bergdahl answered my questions, and I published his statement on July 20, 2009: “I know the story and the accounts that he was drunk or that he was lagging behind on patrol are not true — this soldier planned this move for a long time. He walked off the post with a day's supply of water and had written down before that he wanted to live in the mountains.”

After news broke of President Obama's trade of five high-level Taliban commanders at Gitmo for Bergdahl's “freedom,” I heard from another soldier who served on the search team. “Many of my brothers died because of Bergdahl's actions, and this has been a very hard day for all Geronimos,” he told me after documenting his proof of service.

My source still holds a highly sensitive position, so you won't see him all over the cable news shows. But he wants people to know the hell he and his comrades have been reliving: “Bowe's platoon was assigned to conduct security and stability operations ... . The untold background that led to Bowe's situation involves an article and pictures published by Guardian reporter Sean Smith.”

One of the battalion leaders punished soldiers, including Bergdahl (who had been photographed snoozing in his armored vehicle) with extra guard duty assignments for conducting operations in an unprofessional manner.

“Bergdahl was already disenchanted with the war effort,” my source said, “and I think the extra duty was the last straw for him.”

On the morning of June 30, 2009, “Bergdahl completed a guard shift, removed his equipment, weapon and sensitive items, and left OP MEST with several Afghan security forces personnel. ... His exact intentions may never be known, but he willingly walked off OP MEST and was secured by enemy forces not long after.”

My source, who had been up the previous night on a separate raid, was “shaken awake” on the afternoon Bergdahl disappeared. “We were told there was a DUSTWUN (Duty Status Whereabouts Unknown) and to pack for a three-hour assault. We received a brief that Bergdahl was missing, and we were going to get him. ... Sometime after dark we boarded CH-47s to assault an objective thought to contain Bergdahl. We never made it to the landing zone, as the helicopters took very heavy fire on approach to the objective and had to divert.”

The soldier recounted: “We averaged 18 to 22 kilometers a day on foot, clearing house to house, room to room, looking for Bergdahl. ... We even went as far as rappelling down wells and crawling through tunnels to look for him.”

My source did not mince words: “The fact that our government negotiated with terrorists and our enemy is incomprehensible. ... The worst part for those of us that suffered through that time is that Pfc. Bergdahl is being hailed as some kind of hero. ... I am glad he is safe, and happy for his family, but he should return home to face a court martial.”

Michelle Malkin is the author of “Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks and Cronies” (Regnery 2009).

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Pirates’ 5-game winning streak ends with 1-0 loss to Brewers
  2. Gas industry remedies ‘brain drain’ in Western Pennsylvania
  3. Electricity rates expected to increase this winter
  4. Pirates find a bridge at end of baseball world
  5. Technical difficulties: Living with the angst of a digital diet
  6. Penn State rolls past Massachusetts
  7. Former drug dealer, addict give away groceries as part of church’s outreach
  8. Vandergrift Arts & Crafts Festival brings community together, shows off the town
  9. Most Wanted owner brings his love of art cars to the Burgh
  10. Paying tuition a challenge as costs skyrocket and aid varies
  11. WVU falls short against OU
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.