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Verbatim

| Saturday, July 5, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

“We doubt that the Congress that enacted (the Religious Freedom Restoration Act) — or, for that matter, (the Affordable Care Act) — would have believed it a tolerable result to put family-run businesses to the choice of violating their sincerely held religious beliefs or making all of their employees lose their existing healthcare plans.”

— Supreme Court Associate Justice Samuel Alito, writing for the majority in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby.

“The First Amendment prohibits the collection of an agency fee from personal assistants in the Rehabilitation Program who do not want to join or support the union.”

— Mr. Justice Alito, writing for the majority in Harris v. Quinn.

“(D)espite Mr. Obama's lofty claims, the economy has done — nothing. In fact, it's all getting worse — and Americans know it.”

— former Washington Times White House correspondent Joseph Curl, on President Obama's claim that “By every economic measure, we are better off now than we were when I took office.”

“(T)hese services allow ordinary people to generate revenue by making the most out of otherwise underutilized assets, a possibility that is of non-trivial concern as participation in the work force plunges.”

— Kevin D. Williamson, writing in National Review Online, on government attempts to stuff upstart ride-sharing services such as Uber and Lyft in preservation of government-sanctioned taxi monopolies.

“Why has the labor market contracted so much and why does it remain depressed? Major subsidies and regulations intended to help the poor and unemployed were changed in more than a dozen ways — and although these policies were advertised as employment-expanding, the fact is that they reduced incentives for people to work and for businesses to hire.”

— University of Chicago economics professor Casey B. Mulligan, accepting the Hayek Prize from the Manhattan Institute, for his book “The Redistribution Recession.”

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