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Verbatim

| Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

“In practice, licenses to carry guns in public have allowed law-abiding citizens to take steps they see as essential for their safety, without putting their fellow citizens in danger. It's people who lack licenses that you have to fear.”

— Chicago Tribune columnist Steve Chapman.

“Obama is as likely to be impeached as he is to be installed as the next pontiff.”

— Constitutional law scholar Jonathan Turley, writing in The Washington Post.

“I guess the two old parties just don't want the competition. And the real losers here are the people of Pennsylvania.”

— Pennsylvania Libertarian Party gubernatorial nominee Ken Krawchuk, on the disparity in the number of signatures required for major-party candidates to gain ballot access versus those of third-party candidates.

“(I)f Israel continues on its present course, it will emerge far better off than Hamas and better off than it was before Hamas began its missile barrage. And in the Middle East, that is about as close to victory as one gets. The future for Israel is not bleak, just as it is not bleak for any nation that chooses to defend itself from savage enemies that seek its destruction.”

— Victor Davis Hanson, writing in National Review Online.

“As the only superpower, the United States provides extended deterrence for much of the world. When its leadership fails to tie priorities to an overall strategy that can be clearly articulated and understood by domestic and international audiences, it is no surprise that chaos ensues even in countries where the White House once claimed to have helped improve security and secured sovereignty.”

— Kiron Skinner, Carnegie Mellon University foreign policy scholar, writing in the Hoover Institution's “Strategika.”

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