ShareThis Page

George F. Will: When is making a cake constitutionally protected speech?

| Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017, 8:33 p.m.
Jack Phillips decorates a cake inside his store in Lakewood, Colo.
AP Photo | Brennan Linsley
Jack Phillips decorates a cake inside his store in Lakewood, Colo.

WASHINGTON

The conversation about a cake lasted less than a minute but will long reverberate in constitutional law. On Tuesday, the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear 60 minutes of speech about when, if at all, making a cake counts as constitutionally protected speech and, if so, what the implications are for the Colorado Civil Rights Commission's contention that Jack Phillips violated the state's law against sexual-orientation discrimination.

Phillips, 61, is a devout Christian and proprietor of Masterpiece Cakeshop in Lakewood, Colo. Charlie Craig and David Mullins entered his shop to order a wedding cake. Phillips said that although he would gladly make cakes for gay people for other celebrations, he disapproves of same-sex marriage on religious grounds and so does not make cakes for such celebrations. To be compelled to do so would, he says, violate his constitutional right to speak freely. This, he says, includes the right not to be compelled to contribute his expressive cake artistry to an occasion celebrating ideas or practices he does not condone. Well.

The First Amendment protects speech intended for public persuasion. It has, however, been rightly construed broadly to protect many expressive activities . But there must be limits.

Phillips was neither asked nor required to participate in the wedding. Same-sex marriage was not yet legal in Colorado, so Craig and Mullins were to be married in Massachusetts. The cake was for a reception in Denver. But even if the cake were to have been consumed at a wedding, Phillips' creation of the cake before the ceremony would not have constituted participation in any meaningful sense.

The 1964 Civil Rights Act established the principle that those who open their doors for business must serve all who enter. That principle would become quite porous were it suspended whenever someone claimed his or her conduct was speech expressing an idea, and therefore created a constitutional exemption from a valid and neutral law of general applicabil-ity.

It is difficult to formulate a limiting principle that draws a bright line distinguishing essentially expressive conduct from conduct with incidental or negligible expressive possibilities. Nevertheless, it can be easy to identify some things that clearly are on one side of the line or the other.

A cake can be a medium for creativity; hence, it can be food for thought. However, it certainly, and primarily, is food. And the creator's involvement with it ends when he sends it away. Phillips ought to lose this case. But Craig and Mullins have behaved abominably.

To make his vocation compatible with his convictions and Colorado law. Phillips has stopped making wedding cakes, which was his principal pleasure and 40 percent of his business. Craig and Mullins, who have caused him serious financial loss and emotional distress, might be feeling virtuous for having done so.

Denver has many bakers who would have unhesitatingly supplied the cake they desired. So, it was not necessary for their satisfaction as consumers to submit Phillips to government coercion. Evidently, however, it was necessary for their satisfaction as asserters of their rights as a same-sex couple.

Phillips' obedience to his religious convictions neither expressed animus toward them nor injured them nor seriously inconvenienced them. Their side's sweeping victory in the struggle over gay rights has been decisive, and now less bullying and more magnanimity from the victors would be seemly.

George F. Will is a columnist for Newsweek and The Washington Post.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.