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George F. Will: In Oregon, progressivism at the pump

| Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, 8:48 p.m.
Pumping instructions are displayed on a gas-pump handle as gas is pumped at a station in Portland, Ore.  An Oregon law passed nearly seven decades ago banned drivers from pumping their own gas but now that's changing, in some cases.
AP Photo | Don Ryan
Pumping instructions are displayed on a gas-pump handle as gas is pumped at a station in Portland, Ore. An Oregon law passed nearly seven decades ago banned drivers from pumping their own gas but now that's changing, in some cases.

WASHINGTON

Frank Lloyd Wright purportedly said, “Tip the world over on its side and everything loose will land in Los Angeles.” Today, however, Oregon is the state with the strangest state of mind, which has something to do with it being impeccably progressive: In the series “Portlandia,” the mention of artisanal light bulbs might be satirical, but given today's gas-pumping controversy, perhaps not.

On Jan. 1, by the grace of God — or of the government, which is pretty much the same thing to progressives — a sliver of a right was granted to Oregonians: Henceforth they can pump gas into their cars and trucks, all by themselves. But only in counties with populations of less than 40,000, evidently because this walk on the wild side is deemed to be prudent only in the hinterlands, where there is a scarcity of qualified technicians trained in the science of pumping.

Oregon is one of two states that ban self-service gas stations. The other is almost-as-deep-blue New Jersey. There the ban is straightforward: The point is to spare full-service gas stations from competing with self-service stations that, having lower labor costs, have lower prices.

Oregon's Legislature offers 17 reasons “it is in the public interest to maintain a prohibition on the self-service dispensing of Class 1 flammable liquids” — aka, gasoline. The first reason is: The dispensing of such liquids “by dispensers properly trained in appropriate safety procedures reduces fire hazards.” This presumably refers to the many conflagrations regularly occurring at filling stations throughout the 48 states where 96 percent of Americans live lives jeopardized by state legislators who are negligent regarding their nanny-state duty to assume that their constituents are imbeciles.

Among Oregon's 16 other reasons are: Service-station cashiers are often unable to “give undivided attention” to the rank amateurs dispensing flammable liquids. When purchasers of such liquids leave their vehicles, they risk “crime,” and “personal injury” from slick surfaces. (“Oregon's weather is uniquely adverse”; i.e., it rains there.) And “small children left unattended” by novice gas pumpers “creates a dangerous situation.” So there.

Oregon's Solomonic decision — freedom to pump in rural counties; everywhere else, unthinkable — terrified some Oregonians: “No! Disabled, seniors, people with young children in the car need help. Not to mention getting out of your car with transients around and not feeling safe. This is a very bad idea.”

The complainers drew complaints: “If your only marketable job skill is being able to pump gas, by god, move to Oregon and you will have reached the promised land.” “Pumped my own gas my whole life and now my hands have literally melted down to my wrists. I'm typing this with my tongue.”

These days, civic discourse is not for shrinking violets.

To be fair, when Oregonians flinch from a rendezvous with an unattended gas pump, progressive government has done its duty, as it understands this. It wants the governed to become used to having things done for them, as by “trained and certified” gas pumpers. Progressives are proud believers in providing experts — usually themselves — to help the rest of us cope with life. The only downside is that, as Alexis de Tocqueville anticipated, such government, by being the “shepherd” of the governed, can “take away from them entirely the trouble of thinking” and keep them “fixed irrevocably in childhood.”

George F. Will is a columnist for Newsweek and The Washington Post.

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