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Govt. must live within means

| Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012, 8:58 p.m.

Anybody living in a home has to be responsible for prudently managing monetary affairs. They must have the wherewithal to budget money properly, learn to control costs, keep spending in check and make appropriate sacrifices when necessary.

There are those, however, who feel otherwise. Many elected city officials, in their quest to cover shortfalls in annual budgets, always have their hands out for cash in the form of property tax increases, in addition to business entities, such as water, sewage, gas, electric, telephone and cable companies, that are continually wanting more from us.

Doesn't anybody realize that many individuals are on fixed incomes or do not have the extra money to give? Their personal savings have rapidly dwindled as a result of what has been happening.

There are many people who do not get wage increases. And to those who are, indeed, fortunate enough to get an annual salary hike, on a percentage basis, it most certainly is not adequate to cover the added expenses of what everybody else wants or expects.

The recent Saxonburg property tax increase of over 20 percent is a prime example. That was an extremely ridiculous increase to impose. Many people are going to be hurt by that. This shifting of responsibility (or should I say fiscal irresponsibility) onto taxpayers is out of control and has been for a long time.

If we, as citizens, are required to live within our means, why can't these people who constantly want more of our hard-earned money also do the same?

Robin L. Rosewicz

Lower Burrell

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