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No need for semi-automatics

| Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013, 9:10 p.m.

As I read about the National Rifle Association and state Rep. Greg Lucas, R-Edinboro, who wants to arm teachers (“New lawmakers says school personnel should carry guns,” Jan. 12), I am reminded of an episode of the TV show “All in the Family.”

In the episode, Archie Bunker was upset over a TV station's editorial favoring gun control and Archie went on TV to give a rebuttal. He talked about the airplane hijacking that was common in the early ‘70s to oppose gun control. Archie's point of view was that to stop hijacking, give everyone a gun as they boarded the plane — no one would be dumb enough to attempt a hijacking if everyone had a gun. Back then, it was funny because this was comedy and not to be taken seriously.

Flash forward to the present and people now take Archie's advice seriously. It was a dumb idea back then and it's a dumb idea now. How easy would it be for a student or someone else to overpower a teacher or other school employee, take his or her gun and begin to shoot anybody near him?

For the sake of full disclosure, I am a hunter and not anti-gun. But I've never hunted with a semi-automatic weapon, nor have I needed a 30-shot clip to bag any game. Can anyone tell me what type of hunting or sport shooting requires the capability to fire thirty rounds in less than a minute? For hunting weapons, a five-shot clip is sufficient firepower.

These types of weapons and ammo clips are not for sport. They are meant to kill people. If you really want to fire semi-automatic or fully automatic weapons, then consider joining the U.S. armed forces.

Joe Palumbo

Arnold

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