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Krieger's bad choices I

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Letter to the Editor
Sunday, April 7, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

State Rep. Tim Krieger's proposed legislation forcing plaintiffs to be named in lawsuits challenging religious symbols on public land places an unfair burden on people with minority opinions.

If passed, this legislation would strip plaintiffs of the right to privacy and open them up to vicious attacks. A case in Rhode Island initiated by student Jessica Ahlquist, who successfully challenged an unconstitutional prayer banner hanging in her high school, resulted in bullying and death threats, as well as a Rhode Island state representative calling her “an evil little thing.”

If Rep. Krieger's proposal isn't stopped, people who object to unconstitutional public displays of religious symbols will be forced to choose between being intimidated into staying silent or exposing themselves to potential harm. That's not a choice they should have to make.

Roy Speckhardt

Washington, D.C.

The writer is executive director of the American Humanist Association (americanhumanist.org).

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