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Tarentum's sidewalks

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Letter to the Editor
Thursday, April 18, 2013, 8:55 p.m.
 

I've worked in a doctor's office in Tarentum for the past 20 years. Other than numerous medical offices, the Rite Aid and a few restaurants, I wouldn't call Tarentum a thriving town full of shoppers on foot.

With that said, I can't understand the need for all of the construction going on now to widen many sidewalks, mostly on Sixth Avenue and Lock Street. Most of the people patronizing the few establishments in Tarentum drive there.

And although the new sidewalks may look beautiful, what is the point if they are making the surrounding streets narrower? Now, when you turn off the Tarentum bridge onto Sixth, you are risking an accident due to oncoming traffic because the new sidewalks make the street extremely narrow.

If Tarentum had actual shopping and entertainment like all small towns did many years ago — but never will again — the new, wider sidewalks would be justifiable. They're not justifiable now. They're simply making it more dangerous for drivers.

If the borough is so concerned about making the town look better, why not plant some big, beautiful trees along the sides of the unattractive railroad tracks?

Amy Baker

New Kensington

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