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Mayoral pinball

| Wednesday, April 24, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

In response to the Tribune-Review's tilt on the upcoming Pittsburgh mayoral race favoring Jack Wagner: The article by Mike Wereschagin titled “Pittsburgh mayoral candidate Wagner faults current administration, says council shares some of blame” (April 17 and TribLIVE.com) does just that. The article distorts Bill Peduto's record as a city councilman.

While searching through the Tribune-Review's own archives, I found no less than 95 news articles dating back to 2006 supporting Peduto's criticism of Mayor Luke Ravenstahl. Peduto's opposition is well documented.

Previous articles written by the Trib point to this. Jeremy Boren's report “Votes show Dems' clash” (Jan. 29, 2007, and TribLIVE.com) and Joseph Sabino Mistick's “Good government” (July 13, 2008, and TribLIVE.com) sum up how Peduto has differed from Ravenstahl from the onset and how Pittsburgh has a strong-mayor form of government that has ensured division of the council for decades.

Bill Peduto is a staunch proponent of changing city hall and updating to reflect 21st-century technology. His voting record is one of fiscal responsibility, government reform and social tolerance.

I am surprised with the reporting that allows stand-alone statements to be printed without any follow-up research. If Wereschagin's article were a pinball machine, there would be flashing lights and “game over” on the first ball.

Shawn W. Foyle

Baldwin

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