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'Pippin' a success

| Saturday, May 11, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

‘Pippin' a success

Regarding the letter “Appalled by Pippin” (April 27): That was a shameful critique of Valley High School's spring musical based on two small remarks in the play.

I am a junior theater arts major at the University of Pittsburgh and graduated from Valley. My brothers and I have been involved with Valley's drama department for about 10 years.

I'm happy a small, public school like Valley took on a challenging musical like “Pippin.” It addresses big issues that kids, teens and even adults experience. It does an excellent job of detailing that life is not always glamorous, and ending it is not the best option. “Pippin” takes a journey familiar to everyone — finding a job, questions about love, sex and religion, failure and success.

Children and teens constantly are exposed to the real world. It would be irresponsible to not teach our students about things they will face; a lack of preparation sets them up for future failure. “Pippin” addresses these things in a safe setting. It is widely accepted at the high-school level in hope of engaging students.

Director Larry Tempo and the Valley production committee did a fantastic and tasteful job with “Pippin.” Most shows today — even those classified “child friendly” — have sexual innuendos and “questionable” language. I'm not saying children should be taught to use obscenities; I am stating the point of this play goes far beyond one use of name-calling by a child.

What's appalling is criticizing a play based on minute details and ignoring the talent on the stage. The message of the show is powerful, and with the wonderful singing, makeup and costumes, Valley's “Pippin” was a resounding success.

I'm proud my alma mater put on the show.

Kaylyn Farneth

New Kensington

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