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Basics neglected

| Sunday, June 30, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

In reading the news story “Procedures to combat hospital infections raise questions” (June 3 and TribLIVE.com), I kept asking myself, “What about basics?”

The story outlined washing high-risk patients with antiseptic wipes and putting antibiotic ointment in their noses. Hold the phone! What happened to basics like washing your hands before and after taking care of a patient?

I know they wear gloves. So? Have you seen them wash their hands before or after using gloves? No! They just put gloves on, then throw them away and put on a new pair. What about the germs that get through the porous gloves?

Basics — like daily changing of patients' bed linens. I know we have to be cost-effective, but what could be more cost-effective than providing clean linens, versus fighting a hospital-acquired infection like MRSA with expensive antibiotics?

Basics — like cleaning patients' rooms every day, changing the water in the bucket between rooms and wet-wiping tables, etc.

These are all very effective infection fighting measures — basics! But even more important is maintaining sterile techniques when required. As a retired registered nurse with 35 years' experience, I feel we need to get back to basics!

Joyce Struhar

Buffalo Township

Butler County

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