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Not just public schools

| Monday, July 29, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Not just public schools

Regarding the editorial “The bitter taste of Common Core” (July 15 and TribLIVE.com): Yes, the many tentacles of the Common Core octopus are wrapping around not just the neck of already pallid public education but more robust private schools, as well as home schooling, the fast-growing, most independent K-12 sector.

That is because standardized testing guru David Coleman, lead architect of Common Core, decreed upon becoming College Board CEO in 2012 that college-entrance tests would be tightly aligned with the one-size-fits-all national K-12 standards.

That means even home educators cannot steer clear of the nationalized curriculum if they want their kids to score high enough on the SAT to gain university admission.

Education historian Diane Ravitch, who has supported voluntary national standards, has blogged that Coleman “is now the de facto controller of American education,” a man with no teaching experience who has decided what all grade-schoolers should know, how they should be relentlessly tested and what they must show they know to go to college.

Did any Soviet ruler ever exercise such absolute control over all of education? Is this what Americans want?

Robert Holland

Chicago

The writer is senior fellow for education policy at The Heartland Institute (heartland.org).

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