TribLIVE

| Opinion/The Review

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Fund roads, transit

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Letter to the Editor
Monday, July 29, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

We appreciate the Trib calling attention in the editorial “Funding roads: Dubious equation” (July 23 and TribLIVE.com) to our recent analysis that rural areas have far more miles of state roads per person than urban areas.

As PennDOT Secretary Barry Schoch has said many times, including in testimony to legislators, the urbanized areas around Pittsburgh and Philadelphia subsidize rural roads to a greater degree than those rural areas subsidize urban mass transit.

According to Schoch, any two-lane state road that carries fewer than 10,000 vehicles per day costs more to build and maintain than users pay in gas tax and other fees. And most rural roads carry fewer than 2,000.

Different places have different transportation needs. Rural areas need extensive road networks to stay connected, to get people to jobs and goods to markets. Urban areas need mass transit to accommodate more people in less space.

And Pennsylvania needs a comprehensive, adequate and sustainable transportation funding program to keep the economy moving forward and help both rural and urban areas thrive.

Ken Zapinski

The writer is senior vice president, energy & infrastructure, of the Allegheny Conference on Community Development (alleghenyconference.org).

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Letters

  1. ATI unfair
  2. Anatomy of the pension fiasco
  3. Shine light on union pacts’ terms
  4. Now welcome at VFW
  5. Glassport paving project appreciated
  6. Why link shale gas, education?