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Don't fan the flames

| Saturday, July 27, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

I would like to start out by stating that a death of any young person is a terrible tragedy.

The George Zimmerman-Trayvon Martin situation has been fueling the fires of hate and strained race relations in our country, especially in the media and from high-profile black leaders. The verdict is now in and George Zimmerman was found not guilty by a jury of his peers.

This is the system and values our country has been built on and the foundation that makes our country a great place to live. This should be the end of a terrible situation for both families, and George Zimmerman should be free to go on with his life.

But it seems this is just the beginning for some — up to the president of the United States, Attorney General Eric Holder and Al Sharpton, who keeps fanning the flames of hate and discontent.

The president said early on, “If I had a son, he'd look like Trayvon.” The president also said, “Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago.”

Watch the news in any city in the United States to see the number of young people killed every day. Sadly, many of these are young blacks killing young blacks. What action is taken to stop these senseless killings?

We need to get our priorities in order. Race relations between whites and blacks have improved over the years. Are we now going to let a few high-profile people erase all the progress we have made?

Grant Beattie

Lower Burrell

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