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Fast-food folly

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Letter to the Editor
Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

I love boycotts. For political reasons, I'll boycott any movie that has Jane Fonda portraying Nancy Reagan or any store that refuses to use “Merry Christmas” in advertisements in December.

But I hear that employees of fast-food businesses have been boycotting their employers. Their justification? Corporate employees are making high salaries.

Employees were given, by the taxpayers, approximately $150,000 for 12 years of education so they could acquire good-paying jobs when they became adults. Fast-food jobs are low-skilled jobs that require little training, responsibility and education.

The law does not prohibit any of these employees from acquiring jobs as corporate employees, if they want to follow the job requirements and put in the years of effort required to obtain these positions.

So I ask these employees, “Where's the beef” of your argument?

Fast-food businesses prosper not because of fast food, but because of cheap prices. Paying high salaries will increase prices that would make these businesses compete with regular restaurants and may discourage those of limited income from becoming customers.

These businesses also offer many young people an opportunity to enter the workplace and learn what the future will demand as employees.

So, this boycott, if successful, might result in their employers' businesses failing and the employees losing their jobs, putting them at the bottom of the food chain — something they may find hard to swallow.

Dan Reeping

Sewickley

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