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Gratuitously inflammatory

| Friday, Sept. 27, 2013, 8:57 p.m.

Professor Joseph Sabino Mistick's characterization of us as feeling “a practiced sadness” after the Washington Navy Yard shootings in his column “In the aftermath of yet another mass shooting, we're finding out, soberly, who we are” (Sept. 22 and TribLIVE.com) is offensive and untrue.

We feel the loss of any life, with the random acts of violence shaking our belief that we are safe in any environment. Stating our society is evil because of the maddening acts of deranged individuals is more upsetting when stated by a learned person than an opinion piece downgrading America by the Russian president.

I can only assume Mr. Mistick is a proponent of government action to control the use of firearms by ordinary citizens. I would agree if there was evidence that such restrictions would stop gun violence. Is there a supposedly more gun-safe environment than a military base?

Of course, updating the background-checking system with legal liability consequences for noncompliant gun stores is one part of the equation. Also, revising the different states' mental health laws and procedures for mandatory treatment for certain individuals is another part.

Though we will never have a serious discussion of this serious issue with gratuitous remarks made to inflame the emotions of one's political proponents while degrading one's opponents.

James Lomeo

Monroeville

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