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Prohibition madness II

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Letter to the Editor
Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

The argument Jean Thimons makes in her letter “Marijuana madness” against legalizing the drug for recreational or medical use doesn't make much sense.

She asks if we want a school bus driver on pot. The more serious question is: Do we want our school bus drivers on legally obtained medicines? It's just as easy to get oxycodone as pot, if not easier.

Pot is ubiquitous and a lot of the money earned as workers' income leaves the economy and ends up in clandestine hands. This makes zero economic sense.

Making pot legal isn't going to cause someone to take it up any more than accepting a free “hit” at a party will. Some people will use it no matter what, so why shouldn't the country benefit from it by taxing it and wiping out the national debt?

As far as the moral issue goes, I think a government that keeps itself in power by allowing campaign corruption and calling it free speech is a much more serious dilemma.

A smart government would understand the marijuana issue. It's not going away, no matter how much money we spend on eradicating it, so why not benefit from it, like we do all of the casinos?

Tom Tomkins

Bethel Park

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