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Enough union bashing

| Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Enough union bashing

The editorial “Pa. union dues: Enough!” (Oct. 21) lambasted the Pennsylvania State Education Association and the United Food and Commercial Workers unions, insinuating that members resent their dues being used for political action. Well, I'm one union member (PSEA) who is glad my dues are being used in this way.

Unions created the middle class in this country. Do you remember when teachers were paid $4,000 annually? I do. Do you remember when registered nurses were paid $12 a day? I do. Do you remember when a retail sales clerk was paid 75 cents per hour? I do.

When the union movement became effective for teachers and nurses, it slowly helped to raise our salaries to where we could afford to live decently. The PSEA dues help our students get a better education through smaller class sizes, more money allocated by school boards for supplies, more qualified teachers when the pay scale is more attractive, etc.

I am sure UFCW members are glad their union dues helped our liquor stores remain under state control. The Corbett administration sure tried to privatize the system, which would have killed good-paying jobs and replaced them with poorly paid workers who don't care about the age of an alcohol buyer. Do we really want 18-year-old Wal-Mart cashiers or convenience store clerks overseeing liquor sales?

Barbara Lagoon

Lower Burrell

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