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About Quinn & Rose I

| Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Patrick Cloonan's news story “Quinn & Rose out as morning talk show hosts” (Nov. 19 and TribLIVE.com) was very interesting and informative. I was glad to see that this show had a very devoted and loyal audience. I add my congratulations and kudos to the hosts as well for their great work in Pittsburgh radio.

However, this removal was nothing new. Politics and ratings were not a factor. It was solely a “business decision” made by the powers that be at Clear Channel Communications.

Remember another great recent morning radio talk host in this market named Jim Krenn? He also had great popularity and ratings for WPGB-FM 104.7's sister station, WDVE-FM 102.5, during a similar morning drive-time slot. When his contract renewal came up several years ago, just like with Quinn and Rose, that station also decided not to sign him for another deal.

In other words, both cases most likely came down to dollars and cents, or other non-negotiable terms that management refused to honor. This occurs in radio and other marketplaces all the time.

Therefore, whether it's Jim Krenn or Quinn and Rose, being “out as hosts” in whatever form is a reality that will always exist. Heck, with all the competitive forms of broadcasting and disseminating information in our world today, I'm surprised that moves like these do not occur on a regular basis. A marketplace that is global and now web-based makes things lasting for long periods a rare occurrence indeed.

Richard M. Hays Jr.

Houston, Pa.

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