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LED sign: Negative ad

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Letter to the Editor
Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014, 8:55 p.m.
 

I understand that advertising is necessary for some businesses, but the neighborhood where I live faces a bad ad situation.

We're dealing with a 12-by-40-foot LED billboard. This board is adjacent to our home and lights up our whole neighborhood at night.

There are several advertisers on the board and the ads change approximately 720 times an hour. Nighttime tranquility is a thing of the past.

A representative of the advertising company said it has a right to be there, but would dim the light. This option has been ineffective. We still face flashing ads in and on our homes 365 nights a year.

For any company that feels compelled to use this type of LED advertising: Find out where the ad is being placed. And if it is negatively affecting others, don't do it. Businesses shouldn't turn their positive advertising into a negative.

Patricia Colberg

Kittanning

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