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Coal-seam fires & climate

| Sunday, May 3, 2015, 9:00 p.m.

In writing three books about a controversial subject in science and interacting many times in the media with esteemed scientists with conflicting views, no opponent of mine ever stooped to use an argument that educated people assume vanished around Copernicus' time: “The debate is over, the science is confirmed.” Yet the global warming crowd has adopted that as its mantra.

Before forcing our nation backward into pre-telegraphic times, there might be a few things to consider first that don't require dismantling our factories or rubbing sticks together for energy. For example, there is a straightforward method to erase one-fifth of the carbon footprint of the entire USA without signing any fracking bans or closing any factory doors.

There are 10,000 coal-seam fires burning out of control worldwide. Those fires pump out massive amounts of carbon dioxide — equal to 20 percent of what all Americans produce. Hollywood schedules no concerts to “Put Out the Fires,” even though it would fit nicely on a T-shirt, and no one in Washington has said the first word about it.

The amazing thing, however, is that those shouting about impending doom are as oblivious about coal-seam fires as everything else connected to this matter. Odd, isn't it?

David Nabhan

Spring Hill

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