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ATI has forgotten teamwork

| Wednesday, June 17, 2015, 9:00 p.m.

The VND's anti-union bias again showed in the article “Handbills posted on website not optimistic about ATI talks” (June 14.) It attempted to make the average reader perceive the United Steelworkers as opposing ATI's efforts to be profitable.

That's not true.

The USW has long worked as a team with ATI, the mutual goal of being the world's best specialty steel maker. But ATI doesn't want to be a part of a team in this contract. The company had already told us it's bringing in strike-breaking replacement workers and heavy-handed security personnel. It appears ATI may use strong-arm tactics to bully the USW to accede to its demands.

Does the paper believe ATI treats its workers fairly? Do you remember the full-page ATI ad in the VND during the 1994 strike that told the salaried employees the company “would remember them” for their sacrifices? It certainly did that. It “remembered” to permanently furlough them and cut their benefits.

The article also quoted stock analyst John Tumazos saying ATI workers “should send a ‘thank you' note every day to the company.” He's probably shorting ATI stock to pad his portfolio.

Actually, ATI should thank the USW. Our teamwork provided concessions over multiple consecutive contracts. This allowed ATI to free up capital for the new, state-of-the-art strip mill in Brackenridge. That was teamwork.

So why is ATI turning aggressive toward those who always worked with it? ATI is destroying the drive, trust and company loyalty of all workers — union and nonunion alike.

Raymond Anthony

Fawn

The author is a retired USW member.

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