Share This Page

Easy come, easy go

| Saturday, July 20, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Jason Altmire sold his former home in McCandless.

For a few brief moments, Christopher Reynolds was the richest man on Earth — by far.

When the Delaware County man opened his monthly statement from online money-transfer company PayPal, his account balance was a bit higher than he anticipated. According to PayPal, it was $92,233,720,368,547,800.

That's right. His balance was $92.2 quadrillion.

What was Reynolds' reaction?

“I'm just feeling like a million bucks,” he told the Philadelphia Daily News, at least temporarily extremely undervaluing himself.

The windfall was gone a short time later: “This is obviously an error and we appreciate that Mr. Reynolds understood this was the case,” PayPal said in a statement.

What Reynolds didn't appreciate was the follow-up notice PayPal sent.

“They need me to renew the credit card that's attached to this account,” he said. “So, even though I have 90 quadrillion dollars, they still don't trust me.”

JASON JETTISONS DIGS. Former U.S. Rep. Jason Altmire apparently plans to stay in the Sunshine State for the foreseeable future.

Altmire recently sold his 3,110-square-foot house at 114 Breckenridge Dr. in McCandless to Patrick and Gratia Maley for $548,000.

Altmire was defeated by former U.S. Rep. Mark Critz in the Democrat primary last year. Critz lost to Rep. Keith Rothfus, R-Sewickley, in November. Altmire now works as vice president of public policy, government and community affairs for Blue Cross-Blue Shield of Florida.

DEB CALLS DIBS ON COUNCIL SEAT. It's about time to slap the “shoo-in” sticker on Deb Gross.

We're betting that when the Allegheny County Democratic Committee meets today to nominate a candidate to succeed former Pittsburgh City Councilman Patrick Dowd, who recently resigned, Gross gets the nod. The list of heavy hitters backing the Highland Park community activist is formidable.

Jumping on her bandwagon last week were Pittsburgh's probable next mayor, City Councilman Bill Peduto; Allegheny County Chief Executive Rich Fitzgerald; Allegheny County Controller Chelsa Wagner; state Sen. Wayne Fontana, D-Brookline; state Rep. Dom Costa, D-Stanton Heights; and state Rep. Ed Gainey, D-Lincoln-Lemington.

Also expected to seek the endorsement is city Housing Authority employee Tony Ceoffe Jr., a Democrat ward chair from Lawrenceville.

WRONG NUMBER? Latrobe City Council's usually tranquil meeting atmosphere was abruptly interrupted this month by a loud, racy cell-phone ringtone.

Not only did the obscene ring tone — it included a vulgar term for part of one's anatomy — jolt everybody awake during monotonous city business, it cracked up the usually serious town leaders.

The video recording of the meeting indicates the cameraman suddenly turned to pan the audience, looking for the offending party. He aptly zeroed in on John Brasile, city fire chief, who was chuckling as he tried to silence his phone.

Brasile declined to divulge whose call warranted the “special” ringtone.

— compiled by Trib Total Media staff

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.