Share This Page

Mayoral candidates seek input from Bridgeville community

The two candidates for Bridgeville mayor each say they are counting on more than residents' votes in the Nov. 3 election.

They're also looking for guidance.

Democrat Donald L. Dolde is seeking a fifth term as mayor, but is facing a challenge from councilman Pasquale B. DeBlasio, a Republican.

Dolde and DeBlasio agree that Bridgeville, population 5,300, has managed to stave off some of the more profound effects of the recession like those suffered in high-growth communities. But each man has a different take on what the borough needs for continued success.

Dolde, a married father of five adult children, was first elected mayor in 1989. He said he would retain his focus of overseeing the operations of Bridgeville's eight-officer police department, which has been without a police chief since March.

"We don't have many negative issues, I'm proud to say," said Dolde, 70. "I want us to just continue what we've been doing."

Traffic concerns and improving access to walking areas in Bridgeville are high priorities for DeBlasio, 46, though he pledged also to listen to feedback from residents. He said as mayor he would apply "a gentle guiding hand moving things forward" in a community that has experienced few recession-related foreclosures and job losses.

"The people will tell me what we need, and I'd work to get it done," said DeBlasio, who served on Bridgeville's parking authority before voters elected him to council in 2005.

"The biggest challenge I face is getting the community to decide what they want to do. After that, moving forward is really easy. When that happens, heaven helps what stands in our way."

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.