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Doyle, Kelly defeat little-known rivals

| Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, 12:01 a.m.

Voters chose incumbents over political novices in the 14th and 3rd congressional districts, returning the veterans to seats that include Pittsburgh and Butler, respectively.

U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle, 59, a Forest Hills Democrat, defeated Republican Hans Lessmann, 52, also of Forest Hills, for a 10th consecutive term in the 14th District. Doyle was winning by 77 percent to 23 percent in unofficial results.

In the 3rd District, Republican Mike Kelly, 64, of Butler was beating Democrat Missa Eaton, 49, of Sharon for a second term, 54 percent to 42 percent.

Lessmann, an optometrist, and Eaton, a former college psychology professor, had neither money nor name recognition. Both mounted grassroots campaigns and counted on voter anger toward incumbents to win.

Doyle, whose district includes Pittsburgh, Penn Hills, McKeesport and Coraopolis, promised to continue courting the energy industry as a way of bringing jobs to the region.

“I just think Pittsburgh and the district I represent is where I've lived all my life,” Doyle said. “These are my friends and neighbors. Their pulse is my pulse. I've fought for them every day in Congress.”

Staff writer Brad Bumsted contributed to this report. Bob Bauder is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-765-2312 or bbauder@tribweb.com.

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