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Clinton brands Trump as threat to U.S.

| Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016, 4:30 p.m.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton smiles at supporters at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton smiles at supporters at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reacts to a baby while shaking hands with supporters at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential andidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reacts to a baby while shaking hands with supporters at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential andidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Nathaniel Kisslinger, 14, of Fox Chapel checks his phone while waiting to see Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine when the candidates appeared at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Nathaniel Kisslinger, 14, of Fox Chapel checks his phone while waiting to see Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine when the candidates appeared at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
The crowd lines up to see Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and vice presidential dandidate Tim Kaine along  Forward Avenue in Squirrel Hill where the candidates appeared at Taylor Allderdice High School on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
The crowd lines up to see Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and vice presidential dandidate Tim Kaine along Forward Avenue in Squirrel Hill where the candidates appeared at Taylor Allderdice High School on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
John Woodyear, 32, and Nadya Veliko, 29, both of Point Breeze huddle together for warmth while waiting in line to see Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine along Forward Avenue in Squirrel Hill where the candidates appeared at Taylor Allderdice High School on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
John Woodyear, 32, and Nadya Veliko, 29, both of Point Breeze huddle together for warmth while waiting in line to see Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine along Forward Avenue in Squirrel Hill where the candidates appeared at Taylor Allderdice High School on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Meredith Reisinger, 10, of Mount Lebanon reacts to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Meredith Reisinger, 10, of Mount Lebanon reacts to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Karen Ostrowski, of Canonsburg reacts to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Karen Ostrowski, of Canonsburg reacts to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine walk out to a cheering crowd at a rally at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine walk out to a cheering crowd at a rally at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waves to supporters with Dan and Pat Rooney at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waves to supporters with Dan and Pat Rooney at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Supporters cheer for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Supporters cheer for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine listens to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a rally, at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine listens to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a rally, at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes a selfie with supporters at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Time Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes a selfie with supporters at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Time Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
A supporter of  Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is visibly shaken after meeting the candidate at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
A supporter of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is visibly shaken after meeting the candidate at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine wave to a cheering crowd at a rally at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine wave to a cheering crowd at a rally at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine reacts to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a rally at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine reacts to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a rally at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
A supporter of  Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton cheers at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
A supporter of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton cheers at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters at a rally where she appeared with vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine at Taylor Allderdice High School in Squirrel Hill on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton told thousands of supporters Saturday at Pittsburgh's Taylor Allderdice High School that Donald Trump is a threat to America.

"Make no mistake, my friends. He is threatening our democracy," Clinton said of her opponent's repeated warnings about widespread voter fraud and his unwillingness to say whether he'd accept the election results if he lost.

Clinton, leading in the polls following the third and final debate, spent time promoting other candidates on the November ballot. She urged supporters to vote for Chester County Democrat Katie McGinty in Pennsylvania's pivotal U.S. Senate race. Clinton also took a few swipes at McGinty's opponent, U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Lehigh Valley, for not saying whether he will vote for Trump.

"How much more does Pat Toomey have to hear? If he doesn't have the courage to stand up to Donald Trump, can you be sure that he will stand up for you when it counts?" Clinton said.

Clinton also branded Trump as serial hypocrite during her 37-minute speech.

She said Trump has promised to breathe new life into the domestic steel industry and manufacturing, but used foreign-made steel and aluminum on his hotels. She said he claims he'll make America great again, but makes many of his products overseas. Trump didn't pay federal income taxes for years, yet "stands on stage and criticizes America" for not committing more funding toward strengthening the nation's military and infrastructure, she said.

Clinton acknowledged there are people in Western Pennsylvania who are angry about the economy and other issues, and are inclined to vote for Trump.

"Anger is not a plan," Clinton said. "We're going to build this country from the middle out and bottom up, not from the top down."

Clinton was accompanied in Pittsburgh by her running mate, U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia.

"We can forever change the way little boys and little girls think about the United States of America. If you can be president, you can do anything," Kaine said. "I'm proud to be a strong man supporting a strong woman."

About 1,800 people were allowed inside Allderdice's gymnasium before the fire marshal started turning supporters away. Thousands of people couldn't get in, with the line stretching several blocks along Squirrel Hill's Tilbury, Forward and Shady avenues.

Campaign officials scrambled to get more people inside the gymnasium and determine what to do about the crowd remaining outside. They wound up directing the overflow crowd to a school auditorium, which held another 1,250 people who listened to audio of the rally. Kaine stopped by the auditorium after the rally and delivered a brief speech.

A similar thing happened this spring when Clinton visited Carnegie Mellon University. The Secret Service stopped allowing people into a small gymnasium on the campus once the crowd reached 2,000, leaving thousands more supporters outside, where Clinton's campaign set up speakers so the former secretary of State could be heard in an impromptu speech to the overflow crowd.

Saturday's situation didn't appear to dampen supporters' spirits.

Adina Faeder, 13, of Pittsbrugh carried a sign that read "Future Nasty Woman," a reference to one of Donald Trump's put-downs of Clinton during the final debate.

After Faeder heard Trump's put-downs, she said she realized that "I could be like Hillary and show my support like this."

The debates were an opportunity - a necessity really - to have a serious talk with her three daughters, said Melanie Stoner, 41, of Pittsburgh.

"My girls have watched all three debates," Stoner said. "It's been a wild ride -- to have a talk with your three female children about the things he said. It's something... but they were hearing it in school. Real men do not treat women that way."

Greg Manz, Trump's Pennsylvania communications director, issued a statement during the rally that said: "With just over two weeks until Pennsylvanians go to the polls the Keystone State remains a toss-up."

According to RealClearPolitics, the last 26 polls in Pennsylvania all showed Clinton beating Trump, with her advantage ranging from 4 percentage points to 13 points. Trump has not led a Pennsylvania poll since July.

"Donald Trump's message of putting America first continues to resonate across a wide demographic here," Manz said. "A Clinton presidency will only increase the crushing regulations placed on our energy and manufacturing industries. Donald Trump is committed to making Western Pennsylvania an economic powerhouse again by bringing back manufacturing and energy jobs through the renegotiation of NAFTA and the withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership."

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