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Pittsburgh celebrities campaign with Hillary Clinton

Tom Fontaine
| Friday, Nov. 4, 2016, 12:24 p.m.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Businessman Mark Cuban speaks during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Businessman Mark Cuban speaks during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Mayor Bill Peduto speaks as Allegheny County Chief Executive Rich Fitzgerald looks on during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Mayor Bill Peduto speaks as Allegheny County Chief Executive Rich Fitzgerald looks on during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Supporters cheer during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Supporters cheer during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Supporters cheer during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Supporters cheer during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Supporters reacts as democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton steps on stage shakes hands with supporters as she steps on stage during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Supporters reacts as democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton steps on stage shakes hands with supporters as she steps on stage during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Supporters cheer during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Supporters cheer during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton shakes hands with supporters as she steps on stage alongside NFL Hall of Famers Mel Blount and Franco Harris during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton shakes hands with supporters as she steps on stage alongside NFL Hall of Famers Mel Blount and Franco Harris during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Supporters listen to democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton during a rally in the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Supporters listen to democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton during a rally in the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Businessman Mark Cuban hugs democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton after introducing her during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Businessman Mark Cuban hugs democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton after introducing her during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Katie McGinty speaks during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Katie McGinty speaks during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Supporters cheer during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Supporters cheer during a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Supporters listen to democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton during a rally in the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Supporters listen to democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton during a rally in the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is seen through the raised arms of a man taking a photograph during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is seen through the raised arms of a man taking a photograph during a rally inside the Great Hall at Heinz Field on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton made what could be her final direct appeal to Western Pennsylvania voters Friday during a rally at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh.

"If we have a big win on Tuesday, we will have a big wind behind our backs," Clinton told an exuberant crowd of more than 2,500 inside the stadium's Great Hall.

Clinton portrayed her opponent, Republican candidate Donald Trump, as a thin-skinned man with a long history of insulting and discriminating against minorities, immigrants and women. She said Trump doesn't have concrete plans to improve America but would raise taxes for millions of low-income and middle-class families.

In one of her many Steelers references, Clinton said of Trump's lack of policy specifics: "The Steelers practice. They plan. ... You don't just run out on the field and do what you want."

As for herself, Clinton said, "I have a lot of ideas. I could keep you here until the game starts," referring to the Steelers next home contest on Nov. 13. "I like to make lists and cross things off. Some say that's a woman thing."

Clinton said she would bring pragmatism to the nation's highest political office.

"Everything I've done has started with listening to people and then finding common ground," she said. "That's the kind of president I would be."

Any momentum Clinton built following the Democratic National Convention in July and subsequent controversies that damaged Trump's campaign appears to have vanished. Clinton's lead has shrunk in the waning days of the campaign.

RealClearPolitics' polling average Friday showed Clinton with a 3 percentage point lead over Trump in Pennsylvania, where 20 electoral votes are at stake. A candidate needs at least 270 electoral votes to win the White House.

Clinton's lead was twice as large as recently as Tuesday. Several polls released since, all conducted mostly after the FBI announced new developments in its investigation of Clinton's use of a private email server, contributed to narrowing the gap.

"This is one of those make-or-break moments for the United States," Clinton said. "It might be the most important election of our lifetimes."

The event had a definite Western Pennsylvania flair, including local rock icon Donnie Iris singing the national anthem, appearances by Steelers legends Franco Harris and Mel Blount and Clinton's introduction by billionaire businessman and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, a Mt. Lebanon native who has been critical of Trump throughout the campaign.

"We cannot put our trust in (Trump) ... There's one candidate I will trust," Cuban said as he introduced Clinton.

Katie McGinty, a Chester County Democrat who is trying to unseat U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Lehigh Valley, in Pennsylvania's pivotal U.S. Senate race also spoke. She called Trump a "fraud," and described Toomey's unwillingness to say whether he will vote for Trump as "dainty and delicate."

The program also featured Andrew Tesoro, a contract architect who was paid a fraction of the money owed to him for designing the clubhouse at one of Donald Trump's golf clubs. Tesoro was featured earlier this year in a Hillary for America video that has been viewed more than 50 million times on Facebook.

The Trump campaign issued a statement from Rep. Tom Marino, R-Pa.: "As Hillary Clinton scrambles in the final days of this election to save her sinking campaign, it's clear she knows Donald Trump has all the momentum. The latest revelations about the FBI's investigation into her emails and the pay-to-play culture surrounding the Clinton Foundation is deeply troubling to voters in Pennsylvania.

"Even more troubling is the sharp rise in Obamacare premiums coming next year in our state. On November 8th, Pennsylvania will vote for a candidate who will drain the swamp of corruption in Washington, D.C., and repeal Obamacare. Donald Trump is the candidate to do so."

Tom Fontaine is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-320-7847 or tfontaine@tribweb.com.

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