ShareThis Page
Political Headlines

Connelly, Spurgeon, McGinley win in Allegheny County Common Pleas primaries; Mullen wins easily

| Tuesday, May 16, 2017, 10:24 p.m.
Pittsburgh Police Detective George Satler talks to the media concerning Jordan Bozich, who was discovered with fatal injuries on May 14 on Capital Avenue, at a press conference at the scene in Brookline, May 25, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh Police Detective George Satler talks to the media concerning Jordan Bozich, who was discovered with fatal injuries on May 14 on Capital Avenue, at a press conference at the scene in Brookline, May 25, 2016.
Allegheny County Sheriff William P. Mullen addresses the media in regards to Allegheny County Sheriff Lt. Jack Kearney's job as the director of security for the Pittsburgh Steelers on Friday, Jan. 23, 2015.
Andrew Russell | Trib Total Media
Allegheny County Sheriff William P. Mullen addresses the media in regards to Allegheny County Sheriff Lt. Jack Kearney's job as the director of security for the Pittsburgh Steelers on Friday, Jan. 23, 2015.
Pauline Calabrese
Pauline Calabrese
Patrick Connelly
Patrick Connelly
David Spurgeon
Submitted
David Spurgeon
Elliot Howsie
John Altdorfer
Elliot Howsie
Mary C. McGinley
Submitted
Mary C. McGinley

Pittsburgh attorney Patrick Connelly locked up victories in the Democratic and Republican primaries to be a judge on the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas, according to preliminary election results Tuesday.

Six candidates competed in the primary for a shot at two open seats on the court.

David Spurgeon, an adjunct professor at Duquesne University School of Law and Point Park University, won the second spot in the Democratic primary with 23 percent of the vote. Connelly had 28 percent with 97 percent of precincts reporting.

On the Republican side, in addition to Connelly, Mary C. McGinley, a partner at law firm Meyer, Unkovic and Scott LLP, won with 22.5 percent of the vote, according to unofficial returns.

All six cross-filed as Democrats and Republicans.

Judges serve a 10-year term.

Allegheny County Sheriff

Allegheny County Sheriff Bill Mullen easily defeated challenger George Satler, a Pittsburgh homicide detective. Mullen was first elected in 2006 and re-elected in 2009 and 2013.

Mullen received 67.4 percent of the vote. Satler had 32.4 percent.

Pittsburgh Public Schools

There were five competitive primaries among candidates vying to serve on the board of directors of Pittsburgh Public Schools.

Former Pittsburgh City Councilman Sala Udin defeated James Myers Jr. in District 1, 58 percent to 42 percent, with 100 percent of precincts reporting.

Incumbent Terry Kennedy and challenger Ghadah Makoshi both cross-filed in District 5. Kennedy won decisively in both primaries.

Democrat Joseph Kearfott Burns (27 percent) lost to incumbent Cynthia Ann Falls (72 percent), who cross-filed, in District 7. Veronica Edwards, who cross-filed, defeated incumbent Carolyn Klug, a Democrat, in District 9, preliminary results show. Edwards had 56 percent of the vote. Klug had 43 percent. Edwards won the GOP nomination unopposed.

School board members serve four-year terms.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me