ShareThis Page
Political Headlines

George H.W. Bush becomes 1st U.S. president to turn 94

| Tuesday, June 12, 2018, 2:03 p.m.
This file photo provided by Office of George H. W. Bush shows a photo of former President George H.W. Bush that has tweeted on Friday, June 1, 2018, from his hospital bed while reading a book about himself and his late wife in Biddeford, Maine. Bush is celebrating his 94th birthday in Maine. He is relaxing at his home in Kennebunkport on Tuesday, June 12, eight days after being released from the hospital where he was treated for low blood pressure.
This file photo provided by Office of George H. W. Bush shows a photo of former President George H.W. Bush that has tweeted on Friday, June 1, 2018, from his hospital bed while reading a book about himself and his late wife in Biddeford, Maine. Bush is celebrating his 94th birthday in Maine. He is relaxing at his home in Kennebunkport on Tuesday, June 12, eight days after being released from the hospital where he was treated for low blood pressure.

KENNEBUNKPORT, Maine — George H.W. Bush enjoyed a relaxing birthday on Tuesday as he became the first former U.S. president to turn 94.

The nation's 41st president was receiving calls and taking it easy at his seaside home eight days after being released from a hospital where he was treated for low blood pressure, said Chief of Staff Jean Becker.

Several of his children were in town, including former President George W. Bush. Another son, Neil Bush, called on people in a newspaper opinion piece to volunteer and “to become a point of light.”

As president, Bush encouraged others to be “points of light,” reflecting his belief that people need to help out in their communities.

Bush became the oldest U.S. president months ago and is the first to celebrate a 94th birthday, said spokesman Jim McGrath.

Former Democratic President Jimmy Carter isn't far behind, at age 93, and he'll celebrate his 94th on Oct. 1. Two other former U.S. presidents made it to 93: deceased Republicans Ronald Reagan and Gerald Ford.

The Central Intelligence Agency marked Bush's birthday by releasing declassified material related to his tenure as the agency's director from January 1976 to January 1977.

The items include a video about his path to becoming CIA director and another about his farewell visit to the agency employees in January 1993, the final month of his presidency.

Related to that visit is a copy of a schedule for a briefing over lunch to discuss Iraq, Bosnia, Somalia, counter-intelligence, counter-narcotics and “CIS Ops,” an apparent reference to former Soviet states.

After dessert, the briefs included presentations on Russia, North Korea and “Clansig Operations,” an agency acronym for clandestine signals intelligence.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me