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Biden's 'middle class' remark in Romney ad

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By The Christian Science Monitor
Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, 10:14 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Is Joe Biden the GOP's new secret weapon?

That's what the Mitt Romney presidential campaign appears to believe. It has begun to publicize the vice president's twisted tongue moment of Tuesday, in which he said “the middle class ... has been buried the last four years,” in an attempt to turn the sitting veep's own words against his boss.

The Romney camp has an ad in which Biden is front and center. Titled “Couldn't Say It Better,” it starts with about 15 seconds of clips of Romney and his veep candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan, saying that the “Obama economy” has crushed the middle class, workers are suffering, and so forth.

Then it cuts to Biden speaking on Tuesday at a campaign appearance in Charlotte. “The middle class ... has been buried” he shouts to the crowd.

Then comes a white screen and a simple phrase, “We couldn't have said it better ourselves.”

Will this work? Well, Biden's sentence certainly fits into the Romney campaign's original strategy for the race. That was to hammer home the jobless numbers and tie them to President Obama's stewardship of the economy.

The problem for Romney is that his economic message alone has not been carrying him toward victory. Lagging behind Obama in the polls, the former Massachusetts governor has had to broaden his approach, hitting the administration on its policies toward the Middle East and other foreign issues as he attempts to portray himself as a more forceful choice for the Oval Office.

Plus, voters in general don't necessarily see the wealthy Romney as the best candidate to look out for the middle class' interests.

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