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George P. Bush looks to extend political dynasty with run for Texas land commissioner

| Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 7:21 p.m.

AUSTIN — George Prescott Bush filed the official paperwork on Tuesday to run for Texas land commissioner next year, hoping to use a little-known but powerful post to continue his family's political dynasty in one of the country's most conservative states.

A Spanish-speaking attorney and consultant based in Fort Worth, Bush is considered a rising star among conservative Hispanics, and his political pedigree is hard to match. He is the son of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, the grandson of former President George H.W. Bush and the nephew of former President George W. Bush.

Bush started a campaign website with a “George P. Bush for Land Commissioner” logo and featuring a three-minute video in which he says, “Texas is an exceptional state because we as Texans are exceptional.”

In the video, Bush describes spending the past few months traveling the state and having hundreds of conversations with a variety of people, but says he kept returning to the advice of his grandmother — former first lady Barbara Bush, whom he calls “Ganny.” Bush says she taught him the importance of public service.

“If you believe, as I do, that Texas is truly an exceptional place with a rich heritage and a future of unbound potential, then I ask for your support as I run for Texas land commissioner in 2014,” Bush said.

Bush filed paperwork in November with the Texas Ethics Commission signifying he would seek statewide office in 2014, but he did not say which office he would seek. That touched off rumors he could try to become attorney general or even governor.

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