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North Allegheny quarterback Leftwich commits to Kugler, UTEP

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Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2012, 10:28 p.m.

North Allegheny quarterback Mack Leftwich has played with a chip on his shoulder, believing he had the talent to play at the Division I level despite concerns about his size.

When Sean Kugler accepted the head-coaching job at the University of Texas at El Paso, one of his first moves was to offer a scholarship to Leftwich. Leftwich was planning to play at Division I FCS Stephen F. Austin in Nagodoches, Texas, but is now committed to UTEP.

“Coach Kugler has seen me play just about every game I've played at NA, and he always said that whoever got you was getting a steal and if he did get a job, he always said the first thing he'd do was offer me,” Leftwich said of Kugler, a UTEP alum who is the father of North Allegheny tackle Patrick Kugler. “I'm just glad someone has the confidence in me and is willing to give me the chance to play Division I football.”

— Kevin Gorman

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