Share This Page

Thriving NHL thankful for Crosby

| Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, 10:27 p.m.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Penguins Sidney Crosby plays in the Black and Gold game Jan. 17, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.

The NHL is seven months removed from a lockout that could have crippled its popularity.

No such result occurred, and now league officials believe their product can achieve unprecedented appeal.

The Penguins' Sidney Crosby is among the biggest reasons.

NHL executive vice president of marketing Brian Jennings was in Pittsburgh last week for the league's annual NHL Exchange, a merger of merchandise ideas and retailers. Jennings, though, wasn't spending time thinking about T-shirt designs or promotional giveaways.

He had the game's brightest star in mind.

“Sidney Crosby is a big part of what has made us so successful in recent years,” he said.

The NHL enjoyed record attendance, TV ratings and merchandise sales during the 2013 season. There was little reason to believe that was likely before the season.

After all, Major League Baseball did not immediately recover from a work stoppage that affected the 1994 and '95 seasons. The same can be said of NBA work stoppages that cut parts of the 1998-99 and 2011-12 seasons.

Hockey struggled to recover from lockouts in each of the past two decades. But not this time.

“I think I know what part of the solution has been,” Jennings said. “I think the players in our league are special people, and I think our fans see that. Look at the biggest names. Look at Crosby. Look at (Alex) Ovechkin and (Steven) Stamkos. They're good people, and I think that's part of why people keep coming back.”

Crosby turns 26 on Wednesday, and while that hardly represents an over-the-hill age, younger stars like Stamkos and John Tavares have taken the league by storm.

But they haven't taken his spot as the game's biggest name.

“There is no question that Sidney Crosby is our marquee athlete,” Jennings said. “It has been that way for a while. There's just something special about him.”

Jennings said the upcoming Olympic year won't change anything.

“I don't care where Sidney Crosby is from,” Jennings said. “It doesn't matter if he's from Canada, the United States or anywhere else. He's just a unique player and a unique person. He's the guy. Now, there might be slight differences in terms of what CBC wants and what NBC wants in terms of the Olympics. But we don't worry about that too much. We respect that the NHL players are playing in the Olympics, but we worry primarily about the season.”

NHL training camps begin in about six weeks.

“We have remarkable fans,” Jennings said. “That can't be forgotten.

“Having someone like Sidney Crosby helps, too.”

Josh Yohe is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at jyohe@tribweb.com or via Twitter @JoshYohe_Trib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.