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Frozen Four coming to Pittsburgh in 2013

The city continues to enjoy the fruits of the Consol Energy Center.

Robert Morris University announced Tuesday that the NCAA Frozen Four, the national collegiate ice hockey semifinals and final, will be held at the new Penguins arena April 11 and 13, 2013.

Robert Morris, working together with the Penguins and the VisitPittsburgh travel bureau, will host the event. It will mark the first time an NCAA championship of a major team sport will be held in Pittsburgh.

"The Frozen Four will be a major showcase for the city of Pittsburgh as well as our emerging hockey program," Robert Morris men's ice hockey head coach Derek Schooley said.

The Frozen Four has sold out every year since 1993, with more than 72,000 people attending this year at Ford Field in Detroit. The national championship game between Wisconsin and eventual champion Boston College drew an indoor ice hockey record crowd of 37,592.

The Frozen Four will be the third major attraction scheduled for Consol. The Paul McCartney concert will be Aug. 19, and a sub-regional of the 2012 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament also has been scheduled.

Other cities considered for the 2013 Frozen Four were Boston, Washington, Philadelphia and St. Louis. Philadelphia was awarded the 2014 Frozen Four.

"The number of quality bids submitted made the process of choosing the host sites extremely difficult for the committee," said Bill Bellerose, chairman of the Division I Men's Ice Hockey Committee. "We are extremely pleased with every aspect of both winning bids. From the venue to the community support to the cities themselves, everything will be first class."

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