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Olympics notebook: Beach volleyball players cover up

| Saturday, July 28, 2012, 9:05 p.m.
Misty May-Treanor, right, and Kerri Walsh, left, of the United States celebrate winning a point against Australia in their beach volleyball match at the 2012 Summer Olympics, Saturday, July 28, 2012. (AP)
Misty May-Treanor, right, and Kerri Walsh, left, of the United States celebrate winning a point against Australia in their beach volleyball match at the 2012 Summer Olympics, Saturday, July 28, 2012. (AP)

When temperatures dropped into the 60s for the start of the first night session at Horse Guards Parade, the Olympic beach volleyball players said bye-bye to their bikinis.

Two-time defending gold medalists Kerri Walsh Jennings and Misty May-Treanor of the United States wore long-sleeved shirts on top of bikini bottoms for their 21-18, 21-19 victory over Natalie Cook and Tasmin Hinchley, a match that started at 11 p.m. Saturday when the temperature was 63 degrees. The Australians wore long pants, with T-shirts under their bikini tops.

“It's cold,” Walsh Jennings said, a “what do you expect?” look on her face.

Queen's back in place

Fresh from her star turn as the latest Bond Girl, Queen Elizabeth II returned to Olympic Park for an encore.

The queen visited with British Olympians in the athletes village and rode to the top of the 377-foot Orbit tower beside the stadium, where Friday she officially opened the Games.

In describing her role in the ceremony, created by director Danny Boyle, Johnson said the queen told him she was “very, very impressed with the success of her first film appearance, her first dramatic venture. It was very funny and seems to have gone down particularly well with the international audiences.”

Somber moment left out by American TV

Akram Khan, the choreographer of a somber segment in the London Olympics opening ceremony, said he's disappointed that NBC decided not to show it to an American audience.

Spectators were asked to display photos of loved ones who could not be there during the segment.

The music, a hymn called “Abide With Me,” was described in the ceremony's program as an “honest expression of the fear of approaching death.” NBC producers did not air it, instead showing Ryan Seacrest's interview with Michael Phelps.

The ceremony was seen in the U.S. by 40.7 million people, making it the most-watched opening ceremony for an Olympics.

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