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If Big Ben has his way, more no-huddle Sunday

| Friday, Sept. 21, 2012, 12:01 a.m.
Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger celebrates running back Issac Redman fourth quarter touchdown against the Jets at Heinz Field Sept. 16, 2012. Chaz Palla | Tribune Review

Todd Haley said “no” to the no-huddle. Don't doubt that Ben Roethlisberger is lobbying for a “yes” Sunday in Oakland.

Roethlisberger, long a proponent of calling his own plays, ran the hurry-up offense for most of the final three quarters in Denver. But the no-huddle was invisible against the Jets, apparently because Haley determined it wouldn't be effective. Roethlisberger doesn't necessarily agree, and he appears to be doing everything except hiring a Washington lobbyist to change Haley's mind.

“That's Coach Haley's call,” Roethlisberger said. “He's the one that calls all of the plays. There was no no-huddle. Our no-huddle is usually when we have three wide receivers on the field. (The coaches) saw something and wanted to run the ball with multiple tight ends and keep (the media) and the fans happy, I guess.”

If not the quarterback.

Mike Wallace and Antonio Brown no doubt noticed that Dolphins rookie quarterback Ryan Tannehill and wide receiver Brian Hartline connected nine times for 111 yards against the Raiders' patchwork secondary, with cornerback Pat Lee in primary coverage. Lee is a Packers castoff. Raiders safeties Tyvon Branch and Michael Huff are above average, but Roethlisberger could be a handful for a secondary that has struggled in pass coverage for two seasons.

— Alan Robinson

NUMBERS

39/4 Total first downs/rushing first downs for Raiders, who are 31st in rushing.

40/7 Total first downs/rushing first downs for Steelers, who are 30th in rushing.

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