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Gen-6 car ready for Sprint Cup short-track debut

| Sunday, March 17, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

BRISTOL, Tenn. — There's an expectation from fans that a ticket to Bristol Motor Speedway will get them a seat to NASCAR's version of the Roman Colosseum.

They got one of those throwback, rock 'em, sock 'em races last August, when changes to the track surface forced drivers to get aggressive again. A month into a new Sprint Cup season, NASCAR could use another race like that.

Sunday's race will be the fourth for the new Gen-6 car, and the first this season on a short track.

“Everybody is on egg shells. Drivers are on egg shells. I think the fans are on egg shells. The media is on egg shells. The sanctioning body is on egg shells,” defending champion Brad Keselowski said. “You get the collective sense in this sport that everyone is feeling a lot of pressure and if we don't have a perfect week every week everybody just kind of shakes down in their boots. So I think, right now, every week is a big week in this sport.”

Nobody knows what to expect at a track once beloved for its action-packed racing.

But a reconfigured racing surface in 2007 altered Bristol into two racing grooves, sometimes three, and drivers could race side-by-side for the first time. Without a need to forcefully use the front bumper to navigate traffic, drivers enjoyed the new Bristol.

Fans absolutely hated it, and the track that boasted 55 consecutive sellouts suddenly had swaths of open seats.

Track owner Bruton Smith saw enough last March and ordered grinding to the top groove to tighten up the track and recreate the old Bristol racing. He got some of that in August, and the drama, too: Tony Stewart threw his helmet at Matt Kenseth after contact between the two knocked Stewart out of the race.

Denny Hamlin thinks Sunday will be even better.

“The lower line has got more grip than I've ever felt here in the past,” Hamlin said. “I think we're going to see one of the best races we've seen in a long time here because the low line does have a lot of grip, and we know everyone is going to start making their way higher just to make their car work, so it's going to be a good mix of both, I believe.”

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