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Quinnipiac goalie shines over St. Cloud State

| Thursday, April 11, 2013, 11:24 p.m.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Quinnipiac's Jordan Samuels-Thomas beats St. Cloud State goaltender Ryan Faragher on a first-period goal during their national semifinal game in Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Quinnipiac's Dan Federico checks St. Cloud State's Jimmy Murray during the second period of their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Quinnipiac's Kellen Jones beats St. Cloud State goaltender Ryan Faragher for a second-period goal of their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Quinnipiac's Jordan Samuels-Thomas celebrates his first-period goal against St. Cloud State during their national semifinal game in Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Quinnipiac goaltender Eric Hartzell makes a first-period save on St. Cloud State's Drew LeBlanc during their national semifinal game in Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Quinnipiac's Jeremy Langlois beats St. Cloud State goaltender Ryan Faragher for a first-period goal during their national semifinal game in Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Quinnipiac's Jeremy Langlois celebrates his first-period goal against St. Cloud State during their national semifinal game in Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
St. Cloud State goalie Ryan Faragher squirts water in his face after allowing a goal during the first period against Quinnipiac during their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Quinnipiac forward Matthew Peca (20) works for the puck in the corner against St. Cloud State's Nick Jansen (14) and Cory Thorson during the first period of their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Quinnipiac forward Matthew Peca (20) can't get a shot off while being defended by St. Cloud State defenseman Tim Daley (40) during the first period of their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Quinnipiac forward Ben Arnt celebrates his first-period goal against St. Cloud State during their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
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Quinnipiac's Kellen Jones (15) celebrates his second-period goal against the St. Cloud State during their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Quinnipiac forward Jeremy Langlois (right) puts the puck behind St. Cloud State goalie Ryan Faragher (29) for a goal during the first period of their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Reuters
St. Cloud State's Brooks Bertsch reacts to his team's loss to Quinnipiac after their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Reuters
Quinnipiac goalie Eric Hartzell blocks a shot by St. Cloud State during the first period of their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Quinnipiac forward Jordan Samuels-Thomas (19) works the puck in the corner against St. Cloud State's Nick Jensen during the first period of their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Reuters
St. Cloud State's Jimmy Murray (16) and Quinnipiac's Loren Barron (4) collide in the first period of their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Reuters
Quinnipiac's Kellen Jones (15) scores against St. Cloud State goalie Ryan Faragher (29) during the second period of their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Reuters
Quinnipiac goalie Eric Hartzell (33) blocks a shot by St. Cloud State's Nic Dowd (26) during the first period of their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.
Reuters
Quinnipiac's Ben Arnt (7) scores against St. Cloud State goalie Ryan Faragher (29) during the first period of their national semifinal game in the Frozen Four on Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Consol Energy Center.

With a pair of Hobey Baker finalists sharing the same ice, Quinnipiac left nothing to chance. The Bobcats gave goaltender Eric Hartzell a three-goal cushion in the first period, when he was impenetrable.

Hartzell made his case for college hockey's national player of the year award by stopping 33 shots and shutting down fellow finalist Drew LeBlanc and St. Cloud State, as Quinnipiac cruised to a 4-1 victory in an NCAA Frozen Four semifinal Thursday night at Consol Energy Center.

“I thought Hartzell was great again,” Quinnipiac coach Rand Pecknold said. “I thought he was the best player on the ice. I thought we could have cleaned up some things in front of him. You saw why Eric Hartzell is in the Hobey Baker hat trick right now.”

Quinnipiac (30-7-5), the No. 1 overall seed, advances to the NCAA championship game for the first time in a season that includes a 21-game win streak and the first No. 1 ranking in school history.

The Bobcats will play ECAC rival Yale (21-12-3), a 3-2 overtime winner over Massachusetts Lowell, at 7 p.m. Saturday for the national title. The schools are located 10.25 miles apart, and neither has won an NCAA hockey title.

It marks the first time since 2005 that two teams from the same conference will meet in the national final. Quinnipiac is 10-5-2 all-time against Yale. The Bobcats are enjoying a five-game winning streak against the Bulldogs, including three meetings this season.

“I think it's phenomenal for our league,” Pecknold said. “I think the ECAC was one of the best, if not the best, league in the country this year, top to bottom. We have great players in our league, top to bottom. Our league was awesome all year.”

The loss ended a magical run for St. Cloud State (25-16-1). As the No. 4 seed out of the Midwest Regional, the Huskies defeated No. 1 seed Notre Dame and No. 2 Miami (Ohio) to reach the Frozen Four for the first time. But their high-octane offense, which featured six players with at least 30 points, was no match for Hartzell and Quinnipiac.

“I think we'd do anything to replay the first 10 minutes of the hockey game,” St. Cloud State coach Bob Motzko said. “We dug ourselves too deep a hole.”

Jordan Samuels-Thomas beat St. Cloud State goaltender Ryan Faragher on a wraparound goal for a 1-0 lead 1:49 into the first period. It was the 17th goal of the season for Samuels-Thomas, a junior right wing who scooped the puck from Russell Goodman out of a scrum behind the net.

Samuels-Thomas attempted an encore, trying the same move minutes later. This time, the puck slipped off his blade and rolled right to center Ben Arnt in the slot. Arnt beat Faragher for a 2-0 lead at 5:07, one of three goals the sophomore gave up on six shots in the first period.

“I just wanted to come out there and get right to my game, be strong on the walls and be strong on net and set the tone,” Samuels-Thomas said. “I felt like I had some good jump at the beginning, and some guys won battles. … It was there.”

That two-goal cushion should have been safe for Quinnipiac, which boasts not only the nation's top goaltender in Hartzell but also a top-ranked defense that allowed only 1.65 goals a game this season.

Hartzell, a 6-foot-4, 198-pound senior, was spectacular. He set the tone by stretching his right leg and using his pad to block a wrist shot by Huskies center Nic Dowd in the opening minute. Hartzell stopped 13 shots in the first period alone, surviving two St. Cloud State power plays without giving up a goal.

“He was outstanding,” St. Cloud State captain Ben Hanowski said. “He showed why he's up for the Hobey.”

The closest St. Cloud State came to scoring in the first was when LeBlanc, another Hobey Baker finalist who leads the nation in assists, fired a shot from the right circle that hit the post.

Seconds after St. Cloud State's power play ended, Quinnipiac defenseman Zach Davies got a breakaway shot that Jeremy Langlois rebounded for his 13th goal and a 3-0 lead at 11:19. It marked the 100th career point for Langlois, who became the 19th player in the school's Division I history and 33rd overall to reach the milestone.

Hartzell made a strong save against Ben Hanowski to close out the first, then stopped a Dowd slap shot from the left point early in the second. He showed off his repertoire by adding a glove save, knocking down the puck and smothering it, and, later, a skate save.

St. Cloud State finally solved Hartzell at 6:25 of the second, catching him out of position after a cross-ice pass from Kevin Gravel to Joey Benik, the Midwest Regional MVP after scoring two game-winners among his four goals. When Hartzell flopped to the ice to stop it, Benik patiently held the puck until he found an opening and buried a shot from the right red line to make it 3-1. Cory Thorson got a secondary assist.

Quinnipiac added to its lead when Kellen Jones took a pass from Zach Tolkinen along the right boards, beat defenseman Andre Prochno and crossed in front of the net before slipping a wrist shot from the left side past Faragher for a 4-1 lead at 14:31 of the second.

“We put ourselves in a tremendous bind when we needed to come from behind,” Motzko said. “They're a tremendous defensive team. The next 50 minutes it was us trying to hammer it through. … There was a huge psychological advantage because defending for them is easy.”

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