Share This Page

Harris scores 19 to lead WVU over Presbyterian

| Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, 4:51 p.m.
West Virginia's Eron Harris (10) drives past Presbyterian's Reggie Dillard during the first half Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
West Virginia's Remi Dibo (0) puts up a shot during the second half against Presbyterian on Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
West Virginia's Juwan Staten (3) looks to shoot over a Presbyterian defender during the second half Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
West Virginia's Devin Williams (5) looks to shoot over Presbyterian's Ed Drew (34) during the second half Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
Presbyterian's Jordan Downing (left) battles West Virginia's Eron Harris (10) for a rebound during the first half Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
Presbyterian's Markus Terry (2) drives by West Virginia's Gary Browne (14) during the first half Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
West Virginia's Juwan Staten (3) shoots over Presbyterian's Jordan Downing (21) during the first half Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
West Virginia's Bob Huggins seeks an explanation from an official during the first half against Presbyterian on Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — West Virginia's Eron Harris led four Mountaineers in double figures as WVU took out Presbyterian, 88-55, on Saturday afternoon.

Harris led all scorers with 19 points, while teammates Juwan Staten (16), Remi Dibo (14) and Devin Williams (11) all provided firepower.

Williams, a freshman center, picked up his second double-double for West Virginia (4-1). He pulled down a game-leading 11 rebounds.

Jordan Downing (19) was the only double-figures scorer for the Blue Hose (1-4), who have yet to beat an NCAA Division I school.

The game is part of the Cancun Classic, which moves to Playa del Carmen, Mexico, on Tuesday. The Mountaineers will play Old Dominion and then meet either Wisconsin or Saint Louis on Thursday.

It will be WVU's first foray outside of the U.S., other than an event in Puerto Rico.

WVU came into the game averaging 89 points per game and 51 percent shooting from the field. Both those stats were ranked 25th in the nation.

The Mountaineers, who have won three straight games, did nothing to diminish those numbers. In this game, they connected on 49 percent (31 of 63) from the field, 44 percent (11 of 25) from beyond the 3-point line and 75 percent (15 of 20) from the free-throw line.

Harris, who entering the game led the Big 12 in scoring (20.8 points per game), connected on 7 of 15 field-goal attempts and 3 of 6 3-pointers. Staten, the league's second-leading scorer (20 ppg), hit 7 of 10 shots, handed out seven assists, and hauled down five rebounds.

Prior to Presbyterian, Staten had played 149 of 160 minutes for the Mountaineers this year. He had scored in double figures in each contest and was shooting 54.5 percent from the floor with 31 assists and only four turnovers.

Staten had one or fewer turnovers in 10 of his last 11 games dating back to last year.

He became the first player in school history to have 20-plus points and at least nine assists in back-to-back games.

Before this game, Harris was shooting 47.5 percent from the field and 47.8 percent from beyond the 3-point arc.

The Mountaineers led the Big 12 this season in assist-to-turnover ratio (1.82) and were second in points, 3-point field goal percentage (43.5), steals (eight) and turnover margin (plus 5.25).

They continued adding onto those numbers in this first meeting between WVU and Presbyterian.

The Blue Hose mustered just 39.6 percent (19 of 48) from the floor and 35 percent (7 of 20) from beyond 3-point range.

Presbyterian scored 19 field goals, while West Virginia put in 11 3-pointers. It turned the ball over 19 times. The Mountaineers made eight steals.

The Blue Hose trailed 20-16 with 9:41 left in the first half, but West Virginia scored nine straight points to go ahead 29-16. That was the closest the visitors would get.

WVU is 69-3 at home against nonconference teams in the last 11 years, including 49 of 50.

The Mountaineers are 35-1 against nonconference opponents at home under Bob Huggins.

The WVU head coach now has 727 career victories, which puts him in 18th place on the all-time coaching list. He needs two victories to tie Norm Stewart and Jerry Tarkanian for 16th place.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.