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Second-half surge powers Duquesne to victory over UMBC

| Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2013, 9:33 p.m.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Duquesne's Tra-Vaughn White scores between UMBC's Charles Taylor, Jr. and Joey Getz during the first half Thursday, Dec. 4, 2013, at Palumbo Center.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Duquesne's Ovie Soko is fouled by UMBC's David Kadiri during the first half Thursday, Dec. 4, 2013, at Palumbo Center.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Duquesne's Jerry Jones drives past UMBC's Malik Garner during the first half Thursday, Dec. 4, 2013, at Palumbo Center.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Duquesne's Derrick Colter scores past UMBC's Malik Garner during the first half Thursday, Dec. 4, 2013, at Palumbo Center.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Duquesne's Derrick Colter scores over UMBC's Quentin Jones during the first half Thursday, Dec. 4, 2013, at Palumbo Center.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Duquesne head coach Jim Ferry shouts from the bench during the first half against UMBC Thursday, Dec. 4, 2013, at Palumbo Center.

Duquesne's Tra'Vaughn White scored 22 points, Derrick Colter scored 20 and the two guards solved University of Maryland-Baltimore County's press for an early second-half run in Wednesday night's 94-88 nonconference victory at Palumbo Center.

The Dukes (3-3) started the second half with a 13-2 run that included a quick 3-pointer from White just 19 seconds in. The two guards, urged to hold the ball less and be more aggressive, scored 29 of their 42 combined points after halftime.

“We feel like we're quick enough to beat anybody's pressure,” said White, who scored a career high on 8-of-13 shooting.

But for a while, that wasn't always clear.

Colter, the team's starting point guard, was benched for a stretch with two first-half turnovers. But the sophomore bounced back. He finished with seven assists and three turnovers.

“We dealt with their pressure for a couple days in practice, and (Colter) just went in so timid,” Duquesne coach Jim Ferry said. “That's not the way we play, so I sat him down. ... But I thought Derrick really stepped up in the second half, and he responded.”

Said Colter: “I was thinking too much. I was waiting for the trap instead of being aggressive.”

Colter was 6 of 8 shooting, including 3 of 4 from 3-point range. Jerry Jones had 14 points, and Dominique McKoy added 13.

When UMBC (3-6) made just one of its first eight second-half shots, the Dukes' 40-37 halftime lead reached 14 points in less than four minutes.

The lead grew steadily to 18 points: A 3-pointer by Colter with 10:10 left gave the Dukes their largest lead at 67-49.

UMBC rallied. With 2:30 left, the lead was down to eight. To hold the lead, the Dukes made nine of their final 12 shots from the free-throw line.

Chase Plummer had 27 points for UMBC, including 5 of 8 from 3-point range. The Retrievers made 11 of 22 from 3-point range.

Rodney Elliott had 18 points, and Malik Garner had 12.

Duquesne held a 40-37 halftime lead. Jones had 12 first-half points, including 10 consecutive for the Dukes during a stretch when UMBC threatened to lead. His baskets — two 3-pointers and a driving layup — broke ties at 18, 21 and 23.

Chris Harlan is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at charlan@tribweb.com or via Twitter @CHarlanTrib.

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