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District Colleges

Hampton's Dietz sisters find early success at Grove City

| Friday, May 11, 2018, 12:27 a.m.
Hampton grad Hannah Dietz made a quick impact with the Grove City softball team in 2018.
Grove City athletics
Hampton grad Hannah Dietz made a quick impact with the Grove City softball team in 2018.
Hampton grad Haley Dietz made a quick impact with the Grove City softball team in 2018.
Grove City athletics
Hampton grad Haley Dietz made a quick impact with the Grove City softball team in 2018.
Hampton grad Hannah Dietz made a quick impact with the Grove City softball team in 2018.
Grove City athletics
Hampton grad Hannah Dietz made a quick impact with the Grove City softball team in 2018.
Hampton grad Haley Dietz made a quick impact with the Grove City softball team in 2018.
Grove City athletics
Hampton grad Haley Dietz made a quick impact with the Grove City softball team in 2018.

Haley Dietz said she heard her best news of the week when she found out who won the Presidents' Athletic Conference Rookie of The Week.

It wasn't her award — but the sense of pride came naturally.

It went to twin sister and starting right fielder Hannah, who helped Grove City softball to a 4-2 record the last full week of the season with a 7 for 17 batting line, including two doubles, three runs and four RBIs.

“I feel like her success is my success,” said Haley Dietz, who also earned a starting job her freshman year, in a platoon with fellow freshman and Chartiers Valley graduate Miranda Griffith.

“We've helped each other through all the years of softball, so I'm proud of her.”

The Dietz twins have plenty to be delighted about after both successful freshman campaigns draw to a close. Hannah finished third on the team with a .314 batting average to lead all freshmen after taking over the starting right field job earlier in the season. She also finished fourth in RBIs with 11, despite playing only 21 of 28 games.

Haley finished with a .294 average, with 10 hits and three RBIs. The early success was a surprise to both.

“We didn't expect much coming into college because we know it's so competitive,” Haley said. “Everybody on the team is really good. In high school, Hannah and I played a lot as upperclassmen, but our dad let us know you're going to have to earn it.”

“Dad” is Marty Dietz, a former football player and 1990 graduate of Grove City who is likely thrilled to need only one trip to visit both of his daughters.

“My dad was a major influence,” Hannah said. “He talks about his college experience all the time. When he came back to the college with us, he was like a kid in a candy shop. He was so excited and looking at the new buildings.”

Sibling preference was not first on the mind of either when choosing their respective schools. It just happened to fall together — naturally.

“I just wanted the best college experience for myself,” said Hannah, an accounting major. “I think Grove City gives me that.”

“Since we're twins, everyone expects us to stay together forever,” Haley said. “But we really didn't start looking at the same colleges. We said if we can go to school together, it'll be fantastic.”

That's what ended up happening, and if the first softball season is any indicator, better times await. And though there's healthy competition between the two, their individual successes are reflections on each wanting the other to flourish.

“Growing up people would be like, ‘you hit a home run, and now you have to hit a home run,' ” Haley said. “We want to do better, but we're really happy for each other when we do good, too.”

Devon Moore is a freelance writer.

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