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College basketball roundup: Miami (Fla.) women upset No. 6 Penn State

| Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012, 10:08 p.m.

CORAL GABLES, Fla. — Morgan Stroman scored 15 points, leading Miami to a 69-65 victory over No. 6 Penn State on Thursday night.

Suriya McGuire's layup with 14 seconds remaining broke a 65-all tie. Alex Bentley had a chance to tie it but her jumper with 5 seconds left bounced off the rim. Miami's Michelle Woods grabbed the rebound and was fouled.

Woods made both free throws with 2 seconds remaining to secure the win for Miami (5-1).

Stefanie Yderstrom finished with 13 points and Woods scored 11 for the Hurricanes.

Maggie Lucas led the Lions (5-1) with a game-high 20 points.

Woods' 3-point play with 35 seconds left gave the Hurricanes a 65-62 lead. The Lions' Lucas hit a 3 to tie it with 23 seconds remaining.

Top 25 men

No. 7 Florida 82, Marquette 49 — In Gainesville, Fla., Michael Frazier II scored 17 points, one of six Florida players in double figures in the SEC-Big East Challenge.

Florida took control midway through the first half, building a double-digit lead thanks to Frazier's hot hand and solid defense, and never let up.

Notre Dame 64, No. 8 Kentucky 50 — In South Bend, Ind., Eric Atkins scored 16 points, and Notre Dame beat Kentucky for its 41st victory in the past 42 home games.

Jack Cooley and Jerian Grant each had 13 points for the Fighting Irish (7-1), who opened an 11-point lead by halftime. Notre Dame outplayed Kentucky (4-2) inside during the first half and held the Wildcats to a season-low 40 percent shooting.

No. 12 Gonzaga 104, Lewis-Clark State 57 — In Spokane, Wash., Redshirt freshman Kyle Dranginis scored a season high 30 points, and five other Gonzaga players scored in double figures as the 12th-ranked Bulldogs coasted.

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