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District notebook: Penn State fencer helps U.S. to World Cup title

| Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013, 10:50 p.m.

• Penn State fencer and Olympian Miles Chamley-Watson helped the U.S. foil team's four-man squad win its first World Cup team title Sunday in Paris. In the gold medal bout, Team USA beat Germany in a rematch of their bronze medal final at the London Games.

• Edinboro sophomore wrestler A.J. Schopp ranks second in Division I with 12 pins.

• Clarion named Norwin graduate Joshua Thorpe its women's tennis coach.

• Penn State junior runner Casimir Loxsom set an NCAA indoor record in the 600 meters with a time of 1:15.79 at Saturday's Penn State National. Loxsom's time nearly broke the overall U.S. record of 1:15.70, which was set earlier in the day at the British Athletics Glasgow International Match.

• Penn State's 4x200 relay team of senior Emunael Mpanduki, sophomore Matt Gilmore, junior Brandon Bennett-Green and junior Aaron Nadolsky broke the NCAA record with a 1:24.70 at the Penn State National.

• Slippery Rock pole vaulter Cameron Daugherty recorded the second-best Division II performance this season when he cleared 5.10 meters at the YSU College Invite on Friday. The mark also broke his own facility record.

• California (Pa.)'s Imani Shell broke the school record in the long jump with a distance of 17 8 12 feet at the SPIRE Midwest Open on Saturday in Geneva, Ohio.

• Senior guard Jordan Miller became Pitt-Johnstown's career leader in 3-pointers (271) during the Mountain Cats' win Saturday.

• Washington & Jefferson juniors Ronny Peirish (Pine-Richland) and Josh Staniscia (Franklin Regional) were named NCAA Division III Players to Watch by the Collegiate Baseball Newspaper. Thiel's Eric Steininger (Leechburg) and Nick Rossmiller (Butler) as well as Bethany's Brad Kubis (Hopewell) and Juls Leto (OLSH) were also on the list.

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