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Plum grad Pietropola wins 4 gold medals at AMCC meet

| Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

When Mia Pietropola comes up for air, she's greeted with the same silence that she hears under the water. The Penn State Behrend freshman swimmer is deaf.

But the Plum graduate never has let her deficiency prevent her from competing. She doesn't hear the roar of the crowd, but it's there. And often she's the one causing it.

Pietropola put together a strong showing during her debut at the Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference Championships at Grove City, winning three individual titles, two in record-breaking fashion.

Pietropola, who often is helped by visual cues and a strobe light that flashes at the start of races, broke AMCC meet and open records, and school marks in both the 200-yard breaststroke (2:27.54) and 200 individual medley (2:14.26).

She added a third gold medal by winning the 100 breaststroke in 1:08.34, and helped the 400-yard medley relay to gold.

Women's tennis

Michigan

Sophomore Ronit Yurovsky (Plum) teamed with freshman Laura Ucros to claim a win at No. 3 doubles as No. 13-ranked Michigan beat No. 22 Notre Dame, 6-1. For the season, Yurovsky is 12-2 in singles and 10-4 in doubles competition.

Men's indoor track

Robert Morris

Sophomore Richard Lednak (Kiski Area) has decided to stay at Robert Morris, even though the school is cutting seven sports, including indoor and outdoor track and field and cross country, at the end of the 2013-14 academic year.

Lednak, who competed in both track seasons and cross country, said he may run unattached or pursue club running. He said RMU will honor his scholarship.

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