Share This Page

Campus Clippings: Antone named Big South Freshman of the Year

| Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 12:21 a.m.

There's a reason Maddie Antone chose softball over basketball and volleyball coming out of Kiski Area a couple of years ago. It's her best sport.

And it didn't take her long to prove that at the Division I college level.

Antone was named Big South Freshman of the Year after an impressive season in which she tied the program's freshman record with a .375 batting average, to go with eight home runs, 20 runs and 22 RBIs.

A shortstop, Antone also picked up All-Big South second team honors as a designated player after she batted .426 against league opponents for the Eagles (27-26), who had their first winning season since 2009. They reached the conference tournament but fell to No. 2 seed Longwood.

Antone also was named to the College Sports Madness First Team.

Baseball

Mercyhurst

Resdshirt junior outfielder Ryan Siegel (Freeport) helped lead the Lakers (30-13) to the NCAA Division II Tournament. The team received a bid Sunday night and will open the double-elimination Atlantic Regional on Thursday against Seton Hill (36-15) at Kutztown. Siegel, the former PSAC West and NCBWA Freshman of the Year, is hitting .346 with a team-high-tying 37 runs and leads the Lakers in stolen bases with 15 in 16 attempts. He also has seven doubles, three triples and 28 RBIs.

Penn State Behrend

A pair of A-K players contributed to the Lions' run to the AMCC and ECAC Divition III South playoffs. Junior outfielder Nathan Junk (Knoch) batted .376, drove in 19 runs and hit seven doubles. Sophomore outfielder Matt Wolczko (Kiski Area) added 18 runs and 12 RBIs for Behrend (28-14). The top-seeded Lions will host the ECAC Tournament Saturday and Sunday.

— Bill Beckner Jr.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.