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Duquesne holds on for OT win over James Madison

| Monday, Nov. 19, 2012, 10:34 p.m.

With senior Sean Johnson in pain, Duquesne relied heavily on its freshmen for the final minutes of Monday's 90-88 overtime win over James Madison at Palumbo Center.

The youngsters didn't show their age.

Derrick Colter, Quevyn Winters and Jeremiah Jones helped provide a winning home opener for first-year coach Jim Ferry and his Dukes, who began the season with two close road losses. Winters scored 19 points, with 16 coming after halftime. The 6-foot-5 forward also had seven rebounds in his 35 minutes.

Colter, the starting point guard, had 12 points and seven assists in 31 minutes. Jones, a reserve guard, had eight points and three rebounds in 21 minutes.

“For those guys to have to make plays like that, I think we grew a lot as a team today,” Ferry said.

The game was part of the Progressive Legends Classic, a multi-site event which includes six games in three days at Palumbo Center. The Dukes' 61-55 loss Nov. 11 at Georgetown also was part of the Classic. But unlike that loss and a three-point loss to Albany on Nov. 9, the Dukes finished strongly this time.

A 3-pointer by sophomore Kadeem Pantophlet gave Duquesne an 86-84 overtime lead that the Dukes protected for the final 91 seconds. A potential winning 3-pointer from James Madison's Andre Nation missed in the final seconds, and the rebound was trapped on the floor as time expired.

“Coach said we played with more heart,” Colter said. “At the end, we never gave up. In the other games, we were slacking. Now we're playing harder.”

The Dukes played without Johnson, sidelined by cramps, for the final 5:52 of regulation and all of overtime. The senior, who had 20 points, needed help reaching the locker room after the game. Johnson's status for Tuesday was uncertain, Ferry said.

P.J. Torres and Jerry Jones each added 12 points for Duquesne (1-2). Rayshawn Goins led James Madison (0-2) with 20 points and 15 rebounds. Nation scored 19 points, Alioune Diouf had 14 and Devon Moore added 13.

James Madison scored the first three points of overtime before a Jeremiah Jones' layup cut the JMU lead to one.

The Dukes took the lead seconds later. While the offense was rushing up court, Pantophlet stopped and sank a 3-pointer that gave the Dukes an 86-84 lead with 1:31 left in overtime.

The Dukes had a 44-36 halftime lead. But a 14-0 run by JMU erased it midway through the second half.

“It looked for a little bit there like we were trying to give it away,” Ferry said, “... but guys made some really, really tough plays to win this basketball game.”

Chris Harlan is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at charlan@tribweb.com or 412-380-5666.

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